Sebelius: Implementing Obamacare More 'Difficult' Than Anticipated

Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius conceded Monday that implementing the Affordable Care Act has been more complicated and frustrating than the Obama administration expected, largely due to Republicans who have opposed the law's state-based exchanges and Medicaid expansion. 

"The politics has been relentless and that continues," Sebelius said. "There was some hope that once the Supreme Court ruled in July, and then once an election occurred there would be a sense that, 'This is the law of the land, let's get on board, let's make this work.'"

The Hill noted that Sebelius, speaking at the Harvard School of Public Health, said Republican governors who have rejected the health exchanges and Medicaid expansion have frustrated the administration's efforts to smoothly roll out the law. As a result, she said the administration faces "state-by-state political battles" they had not anticipated. 

"It is very difficult when people live in a state where there is a daily declaration, 'We will not participate in the law,'" Sebelius said, claiming that the Republican governors were preventing people in their states from learning about what she claimed were the law's benefits. 

Obamacare could be a central issue in the 2014 elections. Republicans, like they did in the historic 2010 midterm elections, may benefit if Americans dislike Obamacare even more when it starts to be implemented piece by piece in 2014. 


advertisement

Breitbart Video Picks

advertisement

advertisement

Fox News National

advertisement

advertisement

Send A Tip

From Our Partners