Kaine Praises Immigration Bill in Spanish on Senate Floor

Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA), the former chairman of the Democratic National Committee before he was elected to the U.S. Senate, shifted into Spanish during a Senate floor speech to announce his support for the “Gang of Eight” immigration bill. 

Kaine praised the bill in Spanish, a departure from traditional Senate operating procedure.

According to an English language translation provided to Breitbart News by his office, Kaine made a personal argument citing a specific DREAM Act young woman living in Virginia.

“This debate is about Isabel Castillo,” Kaine said, according to the English translation.

This young woman from Harrisonburg, Virginia was brought to the United States by her parents at the very young age of 6. Her parents performed hard labor in order to support their family by picking apples and working in a poultry plant. All they wanted, like all parents do, was a better life for their children. Isabel did everything right – she graduated from High School and went on to attend college, where she graduated magna cum laude. She did not qualify for financial aid, due to her immigration status, and worked for a year to save money for college. After she graduated from college she was unable to legally find a job. Instead of giving up, this young woman organized the Harrisonburg Dream Act chapter to raise awareness about her situation in order to help other students.

During his remarks, Kaine also tried to argue that the current bill is the best border security bill ever drafted--a sign Democrats are still trying to shore up support from worried Republicans. 

“I understand that some doubt remains as to whether or not this bill will fix our broken immigration system,” Kaine said, according to his office’s translation. “While not perfect - I can confidently stand here today and say this bill will do more for border security, more to improve our current backlog, more to strengthen our employment verification system, and more to put measures in place to deal with the future flow of immigrants – compared to any other immigration bill in history.”

Below is a full transcript, as provided by Kaine's office, in English and in Spanish of his floor remarks:

Translation of Senator Tim Kaine’s Floor Remarks As Prepared for Delivery

The Senate has begun a historic debate on comprehensive immigration reform. We have had and will continue to have hours of debate on this issue. I think it is appropriate that I spend a few minutes explaining the bill in Spanish, a language that has been spoken in this country since Spanish missionaries founded St. Augustine, Florida in 1565. Spanish is also spoken by almost 40 million Americans who have a lot at stake in the outcome of this debate.

First, I want to applaud my colleagues in the “Gang of 8,” who have worked tirelessly to come up with a bipartisan comprehensive bill. This issue deserves an open and fair debate on the floor. It has been over 25 years since we passed a comprehensive immigration reform bill. The next few days and weeks will not be easy; they will be a test for the Senate, and whether this body can debate, offer amendments, compromise, and ultimately come together on an issue that will move our country forward.

This debate is about Isabel Castillo.

This young woman from Harrisonburg, Virginia was brought to the United States by her parents at the very young age of 6. Her parents performed hard labor in order to support their family by picking apples and working in a poultry plant. All they wanted, like all parents do, was a better life for their children. Isabel did everything right – she graduated from High School and went on to attend college, where she graduated magna cum laude. She did not qualify for financial aid, due to her immigration status, and worked for a year to save money for college. After she graduated from college she was unable to legally find a job. Instead of giving up, this young woman organized the Harrisonburg Dream Act chapter to raise awareness about her situation in order to help other students. 

This is one example of many as to why we need to pass an immigration bill. For students and families, such as Isabel’s, this is about their future. 

The last time Congress passed a Comprehensive Immigration bill was in 1986. Many of the concerns I hear from Virginians involve issues that the last immigration reform bill did not address -- lack of sufficient border security measures and a way to address the large number of undocumented immigrants in our country. The last immigration reform bill also did not include spouses and children of legalized immigrants – which created a strong incentive for many to enter or remain in the country illegally.

This time around, things are different. I have been very impressed by the open process we have had in the Judiciary Committee. 

o 212 amendments were considered in the Committee;

o 30 Republican amendments were accepted; and

o 12 full Committee hearings on Immigration and Border Security were held before markup.

I understand that some doubt remains as to whether or not this bill will fix our broken immigration system. While not perfect - I can confidently stand here today and say this bill will do more for border security, more to improve our current backlog, more to strengthen our employment verification system, and more to put measures in place to deal with the future flow of immigrants – compared to any other immigration bill in history. 

This bill will first and foremost create a path to earned citizenship, not amnesty. Undocumented individuals will have to meet several stringent requirements such as, paying fees and fines, passing national security and criminal background checks, paying their taxes and learning English.

And before anyone can come out of the shadows, this bill requires a border security strategy and border fencing strategy within six months of enactment. 

I am proud that this bill includes strong provisions to protect students who only know this country as their home, DREAMERS, as well as Agricultural workers, who perform some of the most difficult labor – these individuals will have an accelerated path if they meet certain conditions. 

In order for the U.S. to be the most talented country in the world – we must fix the current flaws in our immigration system. Our immigration system does not meet the demands of businesses that wish to attract and retain highly qualified immigrants.

It is not about just addressing the short-term needs of the STEM workforce but about investing in the future of our children. In order to ensure we remain globally competitive, we must increase our investments in education. This bill does just that by establishing a STEM education initiative – funded through fees collected from employers of foreign STEM workers. 

According to the Council on Foreign Relations “60 percent of U.S. employers are having difficulties finding qualified workers to fill vacancies at their companies.” 

This bill also creates a fair path for individuals who want to come into this country and start businesses, create jobs, and invest in the economy.

o In Virginia, Asian-owned businesses had sales and receipts of more than $13 billion and employed more than 92,000 people.

o Virginia’s foreign students contribute more than $405 million to the state’s economy in tuition, fees, and living expenses every year. 

Immigrants’ contributions in the high-tech sector are striking, with one study finding that immigrants started 25 percent of all engineering and technology companies founded in the United States between 1995 and 2005.

Through this bill individuals who earn a Master’s or other postgraduate degree in STEM fields from American universities can apply for Legal Permanent Resident status. This bill also changes our current visa system from one based on arbitrary numbers to one that is market based and understands the needs of U.S. employers.

The Federal Government currently spends nearly $18 billion on immigration enforcement every year; more than the combined budgets of all other federal law enforcement agencies. 

o U.S. Border Patrol apprehension of foreign nationals between ports of entry fell to a 40-year low of 327,577 in FY2011; and

o Removals grew from 30,000 in 1990 to more than 391,000 in FY2011.

This bill goes even further by allocating up to $6.5 billion additional dollars for border security. And it requires a biometric exit system to be in place at the 10 largest international airports in the United States within two years, and 20 additional airports within six years.

It is not just about spending more money at the border, but about being strategic in how and where we spend our resources.

One of the key issues that we must address is to hold employers accountable and ensure that we have an effective employment verification system in place.

As of May more than 400,000 employers registered for e-verify. This bill will mandate that all employers use a verification system that ensures all employees are legally authorized to work in the United States, and fine companies that employ undocumented immigrants. 

The State Department is currently processing visas for Filipino siblings of U.S. citizens who submitted their visa applications 24 years ago. I ask my colleagues to imagine if you had to wait over 24 years to see your family members. 

This bill provides sufficient visas to erase the current backlog of family and employment-based visa applicants in the next 7 years, starting in 2015.

Lastly, and probably one of the most essential pieces of this bill – is how we deal with future flow of immigrants wanting to come to this country. This bill creates a future immigration framework that is premised on a merit-based points system. 

The bill:

o Establishes a new non-immigrant agricultural worker visa, and sets forth provisions relating to the integration of new immigrants; and

o Includes provisions to deal with the present and future workforce needs of the American agriculture industry, while protecting workers from being displaced or otherwise adversely affected by foreign workers. 

In closing, I welcome this debate. English settlers who landed at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607 helped begin our nation’s great history as an immigrant nation. And Virginian Thomas Jefferson, as he wrote the Declaration of Independence, expressed his clear understanding that immigration was a positive force for our nation. 

Today, Virginia has the ninth-largest immigrant population in the country, with over 903,000 foreign-born residents. Immigrants contribute greatly to the richness of our Commonwealth. 

I hope that we will start a new chapter and send a strong message to the world that we are a country of laws but also of fairness and equality. 

Let’s not repeat the mistakes of the past but let’s also remember that the perfect should not be the enemy of the good. Finding a perfect solution should not stand in the way of progress. 

Let’s show this country and the world that this is not a Republican bill and it is not a Democratic bill but it is a strong bipartisan bill. It is time that we pass comprehensive immigration reform. Thank you.

Senator Tim Kaine’s Remarks As Prepared for Delivery

El senado ha comenzado un debate histórico sobre una reforma migratoria comprensiva. Hemos tenido y continuaremos a tener horas para debatir este asunto. Creo que es apropiado que tome unos pocos minutos para explicar la legislación en español, un lenguaje que ha sido hablado en este país desde que misioneros españoles fundaron a San Agustín, Florida en mil-quinientos-sesenta-y-cinco. El español también es hablado por casi cuarenta millones de Americanos con mucho invertido en el resultado de este debate.

Primeramente, quiero felicitar a mis colegas en el “Grupo de los Ocho,” quienes han trabajado incansablemente para ofrecer legislación bipartidista. Este asunto merece un debate abierto y razonable en el senado. Han pasado más de veinte-y-cinco años desde la última vez que pasamos una reforma migratoria comprensiva. Los próximos días y semanas no serán fáciles; serán una prueba para el senado, en como ésta cámara puede debatir, ofrecer enmiendas, negociar, y al final unirse en un asunto que moverá nuestro país adelante.

Este debate es sobre Isabel Castillo.

Esta joven de Harrisonburg, Virginia fue traída a los estados unidos por sus padres a la edad de seis. Sus padres trabajaban a mano de obra muy difícil cosechando manzanas y trabajando en una factoría avícola para poder mantener a la familia. Lo único que querían, como todos los padres quieren, era una vida mejor para sus hijos. Isabel hiso todo lo correcto – se graduó de la escuela secundaria y siguió adelante asistiendo la universidad, donde se graduó magna cum laude. Ella no califico para la asistencia universitaria federal por razón de su estatus migratorio y trabajo por un año, para ahorrar dinero para la universidad. Después de que se graduó del colegio, no pudo conseguir un trabajo legal. Envés de rendirse, esta mujer joven organizo el capítulo de Harrisonburg Soñadores para crecer el conocimiento de su situación en orden de poder ayudar a otros estudiantes.

Este es uno de muchos ejemplos por cual tenemos que pasar una reforma migratoria. Para estudiantes y familias, tal como la de Isabel, esto se trata de sus futuros. 

La última vez que el congreso pasó una reforma migratoria comprensiva fue en mil-novecientos-ochenta-y-seis. Muchas de las preocupaciones que escucho de Virginianos incluyen asuntos que la última reforma migratoria no resolvió – la falta de suficiente medidas de seguridad para la frontera y una manera de resolver el gran número de inmigrantes indocumentados en nuestro país. La última reforma migratoria tampoco incluyó esposos y esposas e hijos e hijas de inmigrantes legalizados – cual creo un incentivo fuerte para muchos en entrar o pertenecer en el país ilegalmente.

Esta vez, las cosas son diferentes. Estoy muy impresionado por el proceso abierto que hemos tenido en el comité judicial del senado.

· Doscientos-doce enmiendas fueron consideradas en el comité

· Treinta enmiendas republicanas fueron aceptadas; y

· Doce audiencias públicas sobre inmigración y seguridad fronteriza fueron realizadas antes de que el comité judicial votara sobre la legislación

Entiendo que permanecen algunas dudas si esta legislación arreglará nuestro sistema de inmigración. Aunque no es perfecto – puedo pararme aquí hoy y decirles que esta legislación hará más para la seguridad fronteriza, más para mejorar nuestra lista de visas pendientes, más para fortalecer nuestro sistema de verificación de empleo, y más para establecer medidas para afrontar los inmigrantes que vendrán en el futuro – comparado a cualquier otra legislación migratoria en nuestra historia.

Esta legislación primeramente crea un camino a la ciudadanía merecida, no amnestia. Individuos indocumentados tendrán que satisfacer varios requisitos rigurosos tal como, pagando multas, pasando verificación de antecedentes, pagando impuestos y aprendiendo inglés.

Y antes de que cualquier persona pueda aplicar, esta legislación requiere una estrategia de seguridad fronteriza y estrategia de prevencion en la frontera dentro de seis meses de ser promulgada.

Estoy orgulloso de que esta legislación incluye provisiones fuertes para proteger estudiantes que solamente conocen este país como su hogar, Soñadores, y también trabajadores en agricultura, quienes trabajan en unas de las manos de obra más difíciles – esta gente tendrá un camino acelerado si satisfacen ciertos requisitos.

Para que los estados unidos sea el país más talentoso en el mundo – tenemos que arreglar las fallas que existen hoy en día en nuestro sistema de inmigración. Nuestro sistema no satisface las demandas de negocios que desean atraer y retener inmigrantes sumamente calificados.

No se trata de simplemente afrontando las necesidades de corto plazo requeridas por los trabajadores en las áreas de ciencia, tecnología, ingeniería, y matemáticas, sino sobre invirtiendo en el futuro de nuestros hijos. Para asegurar de que sigamos competitivos globalmente, tenemos que aumentar nuestras inversiones en la educación. Esta legislación hace tal meta estableciendo una iniciativa – fundado por pagos colectados de empleadores que emplean trabajadores extranjeros en estas áreas.

Según el Consejo de Relaciones Exteriores, “sesenta por ciento de empleadores tienes dificultades encontrando trabajadores calificados para llenar vacancias en sus empresas.”

Esta legislación también crea un camino justo para individuos que quieren venir a este país y empezar negocios, crear trabajos, e invertir en la economía. 

· En Virginia, los negocios adueñados por gente asiática tuvieron ventas y recibos de más de trece-mil-millones de dólares y emplearon a más de noventa-y-dos-mil personas.

· Estudiantes extranjeros contribuyeron más de cuatro-cientos-cinco millones de dólares cada año a la economía de Virginia a través de sus matrículas, pagos, y gastos de mantenimiento durante el año académico.

Las contribuciones de los inmigrantes en el sector de alta tecnología son grandes, con un estudio encontrando que inmigrantes comenzaron veinte-y-cinco por ciento de todas las empresas de ingeniería y tecnología fundadas en los estados unidos entre mil-novecientos-noventa-y-cinco y dos-mil-cinco.

A través de esta legislación, individuos que logran una maestría u otra matriculada avanzada in las áreas de ciencia, tecnología, ingeniería, y matemáticas de universidades estadounidenses pueden aplicar para residencia permanente. Esta legislación también cambia nuestro sistema de visas que existe hoy en día de uno basado en números arbitrarios a uno basado en el mercado y las necesidades de empleadores estadounidenses.

El Gobierno Federal ahora gasta casi diez-y-ocho-mil-millones de dólares en esfuerzo de inmigración cada año; más que los presupuestos combinados de todas las otras agencias de ejecucion legal.

· Aprensiones de la Patrulla Fronteriza Estadounidense de extranjeros dentro los puertos de entrada redujo por más de trescientos-veinte-y-siete-mil en al año fiscal dos-mil-once, un nivel no visto en cuarenta años.

· Remociones crecieron de treinta-mil en mil-novecientos-noventa a más de trecientos-noventa mil en el año fiscal dos-mil-once.

Esta legislación va más lejos asignando hasta seis-y-medio mil-millones de dólares adicionales para seguridad fronteriza. Y requiere la creación de un sistema biométrico en diez de los aeropuertos internacionales más grandes en los estados unidos dentro de dos años, y veinte aeropuertos adicionales dentro de seis años.

No se trata de simplemente gastar más dinero en la frontera, se trata de ser estratégico en cómo y dónde gastamos nuestros recursos.

Unos de los asuntos centrales que tenemos que resolver es que empleadores sean responsables y asegurar que tengamos un sistema de verificación de empleo efectivo.

Desde Mayo, más de cuatro-cientos-mil empleadores se han registrado para e-verify. Esta legislación requiere que todos los empleadores usen un sistema de verificación que asegure que todos los empleados sean legalmente autorizados para trabajar en los estados unidos, y multara empresas que emplean a los inmigrantes indocumentados.

El Departamento de Estado ahora en día está procesando unas visas para hermanos Filipinos de ciudadanos estadounidenses quienes sometieron sus aplicaciones de visa hace veinte y cuatro años. Les pido a mis colegas que se imaginen si usted tuviera que esperar más de veinte-y-cuatro años para ver a miembros de su familia.

Esta legislación proporciona suficiente visas para borrar el atraso de visas de familia y empleo en los próximos siete años, empezando en el dos-mil-quince.

Últimamente, y probablemente unas de las partes más esenciales de esta legislación – es como afrontamos los inmigrantes que quieren venir a este país en el futuro. Esta legislación crea una estructura para los inmigrantes del futuro que es basada en un sistema de puntos de mérito.

La legislación:

· Establece una nueva visa temporal para los trabajadores agricultores, y crea provisiones correspondientes a la integración de nuevos inmigrantes; y

· Incluye provisiones para resolver las necesidades del presente y el futuro correspondiente a la industria de agricultura estadounidense, mientras protegiendo trabajadores de ser desplazados o afectados negativamente por trabajadores extranjeros.

En conclusión, doy la bienvenida a este debate. Colonos ingleses quienes aterrizaron en Jamestown, Virginia en mil-seis-cientos-siete ayudaron empezar la gran historia de nuestra nación como una nación de inmigrantes. Y el Virginiano Thomas Jefferson, mientras que escribía la Declaración de Independencia, expreso su entendimiento claro que inmigración era una fuerza positiva para nuestra nación.

Hoy, Virginia tiene la novena población de inmigrantes más grande en el país, con más de novecientos-tres-mil residentes que nacieron afuera de los estados unidos. Inmigrantes contribuyen una gran riqueza a nuestro estado.

Espero que podamos empezar un nuevo capítulo y que mandemos un mensaje fuerte al mundo y la nación que somos un país de leyes pero también de justicia e igualdad.

No hay que repetir los errores del pasado pero debemos también recordar que la perfección no debe ser el enemigo de lo bueno. Encontrando una solución perfecta no debería de bloquear el progreso.

Vamos a demonstrar a este país y al mundo que esta legislación no es Republicana y no es Demócrata, es fuertemente bipartidista. Es tiempo que aprobemos una reforma migratoria comprensiva. Gracias.


advertisement

Breitbart Video Picks

advertisement

advertisement

Fox News National

advertisement

advertisement

Send A Tip

From Our Partners