As 'Knock Out Game' Grows, Author Was Ahead of the News

With news of the violent "knock out game" appearing in cities from coast to coast, the author of the 2012 book White Girl Bleed A Lot may seem quite prescient to some.

In 2012 author Colin Flaherty published his book chronicling the "epidemic of black mob violence" and was immediately labeled a racist for his central thesis that racial violence is growing in the United States despite the claims that violent crime statistics have fallen in recent decades.

Flaherty's book declares that, "Racial violence is exploding across the country. Cops deny it. Newspapers do too. Thank God for YouTube."

"Racial violence is back," the book begins, "In hundreds of episodes across the country since 2010, groups of black people are roaming the streets of America intimidating, stalking, vandalizing, stealing, shooting, stabbing, raping, and killing. But the local media and public officials are largely silent about the problem."

This sort of rhetoric is, of course, quite incendiary in this day of political correctness. A soon as the book came out Flaherty was attacked as a racist. His facts were challenged as over generalizations and his conclusions called unsupportable.

Only weeks after Flaherty's book came out, Salon.com insinuated that the American right was filled with racists and the book proved that conservatives have "suddenly became very, very frightened of black people."

All that finger pointing and name calling, however, may seem unfair with news exploding all across the country that gangs of black youth are indulging the "knock out game" in cities all over--even as the media is reticent to identify the racial aspect of the mounting crime wave.

But just this month the "knock out game" has been all throughout the news. ABC News reported that the game has appeared in "several states." CBS said that it appears to be "spreading." The Today Show reports that "cases are piling up, and police are on high alert." Even CNN notes that police are alarmed.

With the news of this crime wave embroiling America, Breitbart News spoke to author Colin Flaherty to see what he thought of the sort of incidents that seem to speak so loudly to the thesis in his book.

The first point Flaherty had was to warn that "the knock out game is just a small manifestation of the larger thing of black on black violence and black on white violence."

"The statistics vastly understate the amount of racial violence going on," he said.

When asked if there was an increase of "hate crimes" today, Flaherty scoffed at the whole idea of hate crimes. The author said that reporting on such crimes is not complete in any way. "Unless you sprinkle some magic word on top of an incredibly violent act," and a criminal makes it undeniably clear that his crime was based on "hate," the reporting "understates the amount of violence out there," Flaherty said.

The problem is, Flaherty says of crime reporting, that both law enforcement and the media refuse to "focus on the central organizing feature of the violence and that's the race of the people doing it."

As to the police, Flaherty says they are purposefully "fudging the numbers' to make it look like crime is down.

"In the book," he says, "there is a big story from the New York Times how the police are fudging the crime statistics. And its the same story in the Baltimore papers, and a story in Milwaukee, and the same story in Seattle."

"I talk a little in the book about crime statistics around Obama's house in Chicago, this comes from a Chicago policeman, where somebody has fired a gun and hits a car or hits a window and its not reported as a gun crime but as vandalism if its reported at all," he told Breitbart.

So, did this all change recently, the author was asked.

"I don't know, a lot of people say it never changed (that it's always been like this). I don't know the answer to that question. a lot of people said it changed, a lot of people said it just started with Obama, a lot of people said it's been going on a hundred years. I don't know," he said.

But one thing is sure. The underreporting has been going on for decades, he claims, and Flaherty denies that "black mob crime" has gotten worse because of Obama's election.

"I've been writing about race for more than 25 years. Including a stint as a writer for the Chairman of the US Commission on Civil Rights, the first black chairman. So basically I've seen more of this stuff than anyone."

"Am I blaming it all on Obama? Not really. But are they part of this racial division we have today? Absolutely," he said.

Flaherty says that, along with chronicling the violence, the purpose of his book is to confront the deniers who have for years refused to properly report on these crimes.

The author said that for years he was seeing such crimes dismissed as "kids blowing off steam," but when he began seeing regular Americans talking about these crimes more and more on social media and Youtube he knew it was time to speak out about his the media is refusing to report the truth.

"These are the same reporters that created this racial paradigm that made us the most race conscious country in the world, where every day we read about black caucuses, black churches, black schools, black TV, black radio, black newspapers and then we get stories by the National Association of Black Journalists. Then you look at the epidemic of black violence and they go, 'Carl, we're color blind.' So, there's a lot of denial out there and that's what my focus was to show people THIS... IS... HAPPENING... NOW."

But if the media isn't properly reporting on this crime wave, how does he know it is going on?

"What is most interesting is the comments sections on these stories on the Internet where people are telling their own stories. But what happens is that the editors in the news rooms strip out the central organizing characteristic of the crimes saying that they can't say for sure it was racially motivated. Well, they are right and they are wrong."

"Every individual crime is insignificant, but when you string them together then you see this pattern that is exponentially out of proportion, And the editors would like every crime to be nice and neat and have a person muttering racial expletives in front of witnesses or sending out a press release saying they are racist. But that's not the way it works. So that vastly understates the amount of racial violence that's happening in this country."

Flaherty has been criticized for relying too much on anecdotal evidence and himself fudging the statistics. But Flaherty says that since the police and media won’t give us the proper tools to amass truthful statistics, statistics can't be relied on. He relies instead on the hundreds of stories of racial violence that he says he has uncovered.

"This book is about two things," Flaherty told Breitbart. "It's about the black mob violence. But here's the real craziness. The true craziness comes from those in law enforcement and the media who look at this stuff everyday and then say 'no this is not happening.' I'm talking about the editors in big city papers all across the country, and news directors, members of the society of professional journalists who are in active denial about the level, the intensity, the frequency of black mob violence going on in this country. This book is half about the violence and half about the media and the media part is the real crazy part."

With news of the so-called "knock out game" growing, Colin Flaherty's central thesis is once again garnering attention and sparking important discussions.


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