World View: Slain Consulate Employee Told Fellow Gamers He Might Die

This morning's key headlines from GenerationalDynamics.com:
  • U.S. military forces converge on Libya for terrorist hunt
  • Anti-Islam film that triggered riots was a scam
  • Attack on U.S. embassies spurs renewed American nationalism
  • Diplomat killed in Libya told fellow gamers: 'Hope I don’t die tonight'
  • Nationalism in China and Japan heating up in East China Sea

U.S. military forces converge on Libya for terrorist hunt

The Tuesday attack on the U.S. Consultate in Benghazi, Libya, that ended up killing four employees, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, was not a spontaneous mob attack triggered by a fil about Mohammed. U.S. officials believe that al-Qaeda linked militants used the film as a cover to launch a military attack on the Consulate, to take revenge on Americans. The four Americans died in a coordinated assault by gunmen firing assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades and carrying the black flag of an Islamic extremist group. 

The Obama administration has ordered to additional warships into the Mediterranean, near the Libyan coast. An elite anti-terrorist unit of 40 Marines will be flown in to beef up security in the American embassy in Tripoli (not Benghazi). FBI agents, along with a team to protect them, will be sent to the Benghazi embassy to sift through the wreckage for evidence.

American officials won't discuss the nature of any planned military activity, but it's assumed that the plan is to identify the perpetrators and, at the very least, bring them to justice. CBS News and McClatchy

Anti-Islam film that triggered riots was a scam

The film "Innocence of Muslims," that supposedly triggered the riots in Cairo and Benghazi, was apparently a scam. The movie was filmed in front of a green screen, with background scenery filled in later. The actors who took part in the movie were told that it was a war drama called "Desert Warrior," that had nothing to do with Mohammed or Islam. After they were done, an editing team dubbed in different words at specific points, to change the whole meaning of the movie. It's still not known who caused the movie to be made, but one person, 55 year old Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, has come forward. He is apparently an Egyptian expatriate Coptic Christian. The supposed filmmaker, Sam Bacile, cannot be found, and it's thought that Bacile is really Nakoula, based on Nakoula's middle name, "Basseley." AP and LA Times

Attack on U.S. embassies spurs renewed American nationalism

Nationalism is increasing in countries around the world, as happens in every generational Crisis era. We've particularly discussed this nationalism many times with respect to China, Japan and the Philippines. Some people say that nationalism is a good thing, some say it's a bad thing. I do not assign a moral value to it, any more than I assign a moral value to a rain storm or a sunny day. I'm simply reporting the increases in nationalism and xenophobia as a weatherman reports the weather. It's what it is. 

Having said that, American nationalism took a big spurt on Wednesday. On the political stage, President Obama began by expressing regret. Mitt Romney responded with a nationalistic speech, saying that harsher action was necessary, and the President shouldn't be apologizing. Then President Obama realized that he'd lose votes if he didn't become more nationalistic, and his next statement reflected that. Right now, there appears to be something of a ping pong match going on, with each side trying to out-nationalize the other.

A rainstorm can lead to good farm crop that feeds thousands of people, at least temporarily, or it can lead to a flood that drowns thousands of people. Nationalism can lead to a resolution of a dispute, at least temporarily, or it can lead to full-scale all out war. We'll have to wait and see how increased nationalism turns out this time.

Diplomat killed in Libya told fellow gamers: 'Hope I don’t die tonight'

One of the four Americans killed in Libya on Tuesday was an online gamer, using the handle "Vile Rat" in the game "EVE Online." He was an avid participant of EVE, having served in the game’s virtual government as a cunning and influential intergalactic diplomat in a sprawling virtual galaxy. On Tuesday night, he wrote to his fellow gamers, "Assuming we don’t die tonight. We saw one of our ‘police’ that guard the compound taking pictures." He was dead a few hours later. Wired and AP

Nationalism in China and Japan heating up in East China Sea

Just as an increasingly nationalistic America is sending warships to Libya, an increasingly nationalistic China is sending warships to Libya.

The levels of nationalistic fury in China and Japan are continuing to grow over the disputed Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in the East China Sea. Japan's national government has purchased the islands from their private owners, effectively "nationalizing" them. In response, China's armed forces are sending two warships to the region, nominally to provide weather reports. According to a Chinese statement, the Chinese government will take all measures to safeguard national territorial sovereignty. "Long gone are the days when the Chinese territory could be grabbed only by an unequal treaty." The Asahi Shimbun (Tokyo) and Xinhua

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