World View: Coordinated Suicide Attack in Kabul, Afghanistan

This morning's key headlines from GenerationalDynamics.com

  • Britain's Prince Harry acknowledges that he killed Taliban insurgents
  • Coordinated suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, part of increasing violence
  • Massive espionage malware targeting governments undetected for 5 years
  • Russia sends planes to Lebanon to evacuate Russians in Syria
  • Will Rogers

Britain's Prince Harry acknowledges that he killed Taliban insurgents

Prince Harry with Play Station controller during a VHR (very high readiness) shift
Prince Harry with Play Station controller during a VHR (very high readiness) shift

Completing his most recent 4-month tour of duty as "Captain Wales" in British-controlled Camp Bastion in Helmand province in Afghanistan, Britain's Prince Harry acknowledged that he's killed Taliban insurgents serving as a helicopter pilot, though he won't reveal how many. He said it was sometimes justified to "take a life to save a life. That's what we revolve around, I suppose." Prince Harry, third in line to the British throne, and considered to be the world's most eligible bachelor, has frequently expressed his feelings that he'd rather be in Afghanistan service with his comrades, than back in London living the posh royal life. He presents a problem for the army, however, because it would be a major public relations coup for the Taliban if they succeeded in killing him, and they've expressed their determination to target him in the past. CNN and Daily Mail (London)

Coordinated suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, part of increasing violence

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for an 8-hour assault, with suicide bombings and gunfire from automatic rifles, on the the headquarters of the Kabul traffic police in Afghanistan. This was the second major attack in Kabul in less than a week. Last week, six suicide bombers attack the National Directorate of Security, killing two guards. Terrorist violence across Afghanistan has been increasing during the last 12 months, raising doubts about the success of the Afghan security forces after the Nato forces leave. Apparently the Taliban terrorists are changing their strategy as the Nato forces leave, specifically targeting the Afghan security forces. According to a government official, "Honestly speaking, this type of attack, at the start of the year, indicates the coming months are going to be tough." Reuters

Massive espionage malware targeting governments undetected for 5 years

Researchers have uncovered an ongoing, large-scale computer espionage network, dubbed Red October, that's targeting hundreds of diplomatic, governmental, and scientific organizations in at least 39 countries, including the Russia, Iran, and the United States. The highly coordinated campaign, has been active since 2007, raising the possibility it has already siphoned up hundreds of terabytes of sensitive information. It uses more than 1,000 distinct modules that have never been seen before to customize attack profiles for each victim. Among other things, components target individual PCs, networking equipment from Cisco Systems, and smartphones from Apple, Microsoft, and Nokia. The main purpose of the campaign is to gather classified information and geopolitical intelligence. Stolen credentials were compiled and used later when the attackers needed to guess secret phrases in other locations. Although China is thought to be the perpetrator, there's no evidence to link the attack to China or to any other particular nation-state. Ars Technica

Russia sends planes to Lebanon to evacuate Russians in Syria

Because it's too dangerous now to fly into Damascus airport, Russia is sending evacuation planes to Beirut, Lebanon, to evacuate Russians who wish to return to Russia. There are some 150 people, mainly women and children, waiting for the planes to arrive. Russia has contingency plans to evacuate thousands of its nationals from Syria, using planes and sea vessels. Most are Russian women married to Syrians. The move is considered to be one more sign that Russia is having increasing doubts about Syrian president Bashar al-Assad's ability to stay in power. Daily Star (Beirut)

Will Rogers

"Everything is changing. People are taking the comedians seriously and the politicians as a joke." -- Will Rogers


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