The Conversation

The worst sort of appeasement

In response to Critics of Nuke Deal Full of 'Tough Talk and Bluster' According To Obama:

Obama's really going to hate the tough talk and bluster from Bret Stephens at the Wall Street Journal, who compares the Iran deal unfavorably with Neville Chamberlain at Munich, and the Paris Accords that hung South Vietnam and Cambodia out to dry.  Not to cut Chamberlain too much slack, but the West actually did get something out of his "peace in our time" deal with Hitler, namely the time necessary to gear up for a fight with the Nazi war machine.  

But now it's Iran that wants time, and Obama is eager to give it to them.  Recent history matters, even though Obama is always instructing his loyal followers to forget it, and in the Middle East he's still the guy that Vlad Putin ran out of Syria on a rail, while flummoxed Secretary of State John Kerry did his best impression of Dr. Bunsen Honeydew's assistant Beaker from "The Muppet Show."  Iran is going to have a field day gloating about this deal.  Heck, they're not even waiting for Congress to sign on, let alone for the ink to dry.  No one in Iran seems to think it's terribly important to let Obama complete the appeasement process before they beginning running around the world and telling everyone what a bunch of suckers this Administration is.

Stephens has some grim predictions for what comes next:

After Geneva there will come a new, chaotic Mideast reality in which the United States will lose leverage over enemies and friends alike.

What will that look like? Iran will gradually shake free of sanctions and glide into a zone of nuclear ambiguity that will keep its adversaries guessing until it opts to make its capabilities known. Saudi Arabia will move swiftly to acquire a nuclear deterrent from its clients in Islamabad; Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal made that clear to the Journal last week when he indiscreetly discussed "the arrangement with Pakistan." Egypt is beginning to ponder a nuclear option of its own while drawing closer to a security alliance with Russia.

As for Israel, it cannot afford to live in a neighborhood where Iran becomes nuclear, Assad remains in power, and Hezbollah—Israel's most immediate military threat—gains strength, clout and battlefield experience. The chances that Israel will hazard a strike on Iran's nuclear sites greatly increased since Geneva. More so the chances of another war with Hezbollah.

Meanwhile, Obama is getting "cowboy up" advice from a nation that refuses to go along with the lifting of sanctions on Iran, and is willing to express deep skepticism about the Geneva agreement in public.  That nation is... Canada.



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