Justice Dept faulted in Fast and Furious inspector general's report; one official resigns, one retires

Justice Dept faulted in Fast and Furious inspector general's report; one official resigns, one retires

(AP) Justice Dept faulted in gun-trafficking operation
By PETE YOST
Associated Press
WASHINGTON

The Justice Department’s internal watchdog on Wednesday faulted the agency for misguided strategies, errors in judgment and management failures during a bungled gun-trafficking probe in Arizona that resulted in hundreds of weapons turning up at crime scenes in the U.S. and Mexico.

Two senior officials left the department, one by resignation and one by retirement, upon release of the report.

In a 471-page report, Inspector General Michael Horowitz referred more than a dozen people for possible department disciplinary action for their roles in Operation Fast and Furious and a separate, earlier probe known as Wide Receiver, undertaken during the George W. Bush administration. The report did not criticize Attorney General Eric Holder, but said lower-level officials should have briefed him about the investigation much earlier.

The report found no evidence that Holder was informed about the Fast and Furious operation before Jan. 31, 2011, or that the attorney general was told about the much-disputed gun-walking tactic employed by the department’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The inspector general found fault with the work of the senior ATF leadership, the ATF staff and U.S. attorney’s office in Phoenix and senior officials of Justice’s criminal division in Washington. He also said that poor internal information-gathering and drafting at Justice and ATF caused the department to initially misinform Congress about Fast and Furious.

One of those criticized in the report, former ATF acting director Kenneth Melson, who headed that office during the Fast and Furious investigation, retired upon release of the report.

Another of those criticized, Justice Department career attorney Jason Weinstein, resigned. Weinstein was a deputy assistant attorney general in Justice’s criminal division in Washington.

Weinstein’s lawyer, Michael Bromwich, called the report’s criticism “profoundly wrong” and “deeply flawed.”

Read More Stories About:

Big Government, Congress, Crime, Eric Holder

Breitbart Video Picks