West continues to drift into Democrats' column

West continues to drift into Democrats' column

(AP) West continues to drift into Democrats’ column
By NICHOLAS RICCARDI
Associated Press
DENVER
A political generation ago, the West signaled the nation’s rightward swing _ from the emergence of Ronald Reagan to the success of tax-limitation ballot measures in California and Colorado. But now the fabled expanse of jagged peaks, arid deserts and emerald coastlines is trending in a different direction.

From Washington state _ where voters in November legalized marijuana and upheld the legality of gay marriage _ to New Mexico, once a hotly contested swing state that Republicans ceded to Democrats in the presidential campaign, the West has become largely Democratic terrain.

There are, as always, exceptions. Lightly populated Idaho and Wyoming remain strongly Republican, as does Utah. And Democrats are struggling in Arizona, where a bruising immigration debate has given Republicans a lock on statewide offices but may provide Democrats an opening by firming up their support among the state’s growing Hispanic population. Still, the overall trend is clear, according to analysts on all sides of the political spectrum.

The shift is due to a combination of factors: the fusion of the region’s libertarian spirit with both an influx of transplants from more liberal states seeking a better quality of life, and a growing immigrant population alienated by increasingly hardline Republican immigration proposals.

Politics is different in the region. Western states generally have weak political parties, part of the legacy of their political maturation during the progressive era at the start of the 20th century. Most local elections are nonpartisan affairs and voters often have the right to unilaterally set policy via ballot initiative. Western voters have long cherished nonpartisan independence, even when they voted a relatively straight party ticket.

During the 1980s and 1990s, that libertarian streak fed a series of Republican victories as voters approved tax-limitation initiatives, protested federal environmental regulations and kept statehouses firmly in the GOP’s hands. But nowadays it means something else, Carrick said.

Ironically, Republicans’ success may have contributed to that shift. The party managed to enshrine staunch anti-tax measures in several states’ constitutions through ballot initiatives, making it very difficult to raise taxes in California, Colorado and Washington state. As a result, Democrats can’t easily raise revenue _ but they also can’t be attacked for doing so, said Ron Dotzauer, a Seattle-based Democratic strategist. “They can’t be defined as the pro-tax group because they can’t tax,” he said.

There are prominent Republicans who demonstrate that the party can still win the region. Brian Sandoval in Nevada and Susana Martinez in New Mexico are popular Republican governors, but their relatively moderate stances often put them at odds with the national party. Both, for example, just agreed to the Medicaid expansion under President Barack Obama’s health care plan, something that is anathema to many conservative Republicans.

But McCleskey acknowledged that New Mexico Republicans were helped by the national GOP basically giving up on the presidential race in the state. GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney did not contest the state, minimizing the damage of a divisive presidential campaign.

Jill Hanauer is a Democratic strategist who engineered her party’s takeover of the Colorado state Legislature in 2004. She agrees with McCleskey that the West cannot be considered a Democratic lock.

In 2002, Ruy Teixeira, a Washington, D.C.-based Democratic strategist, co-wrote “The Emerging Democratic Majority,” which predicted that demographic and social trends would turn parts of the country that were deep red, like the interior Mountain West, into Democratic-leaning states. The book was published shortly after Republicans took back the U.S. Senate in the 2002 midterm elections and was received skeptically.

Last year, Teixeira and a bevy of other researchers published a new book on the Mountain West as America’s new swing region. Now there was little pushback.

Teixeira said the West’s shift has been dramatic because of the heavy migration to the region. Another factor is the ballot initiative process, which magnifies political trends by making it easier to enact dramatic policy changes like marijuana legalization.

But he argued in an interview that what’s happened to the West is not very different from what’s taking place across the country. Surveys for his book last year found it only slightly more libertarian on social issues and holding similar views toward government and taxation as other parts of the country. That, he said, is bad news for Republicans _ their problem is national, not regional.

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Follow Nicholas Riccardi on Twitter at www.twitter.com/nickriccardi

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