Jurors in Zimmerman Trial Have Question on Manslaughter Charge

Jurors in Zimmerman Trial Have Question on Manslaughter Charge

(AP) Jurors in Zimmerman trial have question
By TAMARA LUSH and MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
SANFORD, Fla.
Jurors deciding whether George Zimmerman committed a crime when he fatally shot Trayvon Martin asked Saturday for clarification on the charge of manslaughter _ a possible indication they were considering the lesser charge instead of second-degree murder.

They also stayed at the courthouse through dinner, an apparent sign they planned to deliberate into the night. Meanwhile, a crowd outside the courthouse that started at 100 people earlier in the day doubled in size in anticipation of a potential verdict.

The six-member, all-woman jury presented its question Saturday evening.


As jurors awaited an answer, Nelson talked to lawyers at the bench and after a half-hour recess, they agreed to send a note back asking the jurors to elaborate.


Jurors didn’t send back a response to the note.

Zimmerman, 29, is charged with second-degree murder but jurors also have the options of finding him guilty of manslaughter or not guilty. He has pleaded not guilty, claiming he shot the 17-year-old Martin in self-defense.

To win a manslaughter conviction, prosecutors must show only that Zimmerman killed without lawful justification. To win a second-degree murder conviction, prosecutors must convince jurors Zimmerman acted with ill will, hatred or spite toward Martin.

Zimmerman faces a maximum prison sentence of life for second-degree murder and 30 years if convicted of manslaughter, due to extra sentencing guidelines for committing a crime with a gun.

Outside lawyers with no connection to the case said the jury’s question could be an indication that it has taken second-degree murder off the table.


Added Orlando defense attorney David Hill: “Why would they bother to ask for clarification unless they were thinking about manslaughter?”

To convict Zimmermann of manslaughter, jurors must believe Zimmerman intentionally committed an act that caused Martin’s death, according to the judge’s instructions. He can’t be guilty of manslaughter merely by committing a negligent act or if the killing was excusable, the instructions say.

The jury started deliberating Friday afternoon. At the time jurors asked their question about manslaughter Saturday, they had been deliberating for a total of 11 1/2 hours over two days. On Friday, they asked their first question: a request for a list of all the evidence.

Jurors were being sequestered, and their identities are kept anonymous _ they are identified only by number.

As jurors deliberated for a second day, there was little understanding between two camps assembled to support Martin and Zimmerman outside the Seminole County Courthouse.


Patricia Dalton, 60, yelled back: “It’s a tragedy that could have been avoided!”

Dalton, like most of the people at the suburban Orlando courthouse, says she’s there in support of the family of Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old black teen from Miami who Zimmerman fatally shot last year.

The supporters stayed peaceful for most of the day until in the afternoon when sheriff’s deputies had to separate a Zimmerman supporter from a pro-Martin demonstrator after a heated exchange. There was no physical contact made and no one was arrested. Saturday night, two men who got into an argument left voluntarily after talking with sheriff’s deputies.

Others remained calm. Two Orlando sisters, dressed in colorful African-print clothing and walking on stilts, sang “Lean on Me” with the crowd as a man strummed a banjo and people waved signs.


Prosecutors and Trayvon Martin’s family say Zimmerman profiled Martin because of the teen’s race. Those allegations, and a 44-day delay before police arrested Zimmerman, sparked nationwide protests involving leading national civil rights leaders and spurred emotional debates about gun control, self-defense laws, race, and equal justice under the law.

In Saturday’s strong Florida sun, some people at the courthouse wore hoodies, as Martin had when he died. One woman lay in the grass, her arms spread, in a re-creation of Martin’s death. Those in the smaller pro-Zimmerman camp held small signs, saying things like “We love you George” and “George got hit you must acquit.”

Joseph Uy of Longwood was among an even smaller group: the few who said they had no opinion on whether Zimmerman was guilty. He said he came because he was “just curious.”


By mid-afternoon, people rallied in the heat and chanted slogans as a looming thundercloud threatened a downpour.


Police and civic leaders have pleaded for calm in Sanford and across the country after the verdict.


In New York on Saturday, the Rev. Al Sharpton said that no matter the verdict, any demonstrations that follow it must be peaceful.


The Rev. Jesse Jackson had a similar message. He tweeted that people should “avoid violence because it only leads to more tragedies.”

Benjamin Crump, an attorney for Martin’s family, said the parents are emotional but doing as well as expected as they await a verdict.


On Saturday morning, Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, shared on Twitter what she called her favorite Bible verse: “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.”

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Associated Press writers Kyle Hightower and Tony Winton in Sanford; and Colleen Long in New York contributed to this report.

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Follow Tamara Lush on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamaralush.

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