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LIVE WIRE: Latest Updates On President Obama’s UK Visit

Rolling coverage of President Obama’s visit to the UK, his fifth, and his intervention in the European Union referendum, which polling shows is not welcomed by a majority of British voters.

Latest updates below:

Breitbart’s Latest Reporting:


President Obama finds time to indulge one of his favourite hobbies with David Cameron:

US President Barack Obama (R) talks with British Prime Minister David Cameron (L) as they walk onto the 3rd green at The Grove Golf Course near Watford in Hertfordshire, north of London, on April 23, 2016.

US President Barack Obama talks with British Prime Minister David Cameron as they walk onto the 3rd green at The Grove Golf Course near Watford in Hertfordshire, north of London, on April 23, 2016 (JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images).


President Obama meets Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn:

After the Town Hall meeting, President Obama had a 30 minute meeting with Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the British Labour Party and a long-time critic of the U.S. and its global role.

For a man who until very recently spent his career as a backbench Member of Parliament, it represents the highest profile meeting Mr. Corbyn has enjoyed as Leader of Her Majesty’s Most Loyal Opposition.

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 23: Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves after meeting with US President Barack Obama after he spoke at the Royal Horticultural Halls on April 23, 2016 in London, England.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves after meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama after he spoke at the Royal Horticultural Halls on April 23, 2016 in London, England (Matt Cardy/Getty Images).

An unusually smartly-turned out Mr. Corbyn told reporters that President Obama congratulated him on his election as party leader and that they discussed inequality and poverty, as well as “the challenges facing post-industrial societies and the power of global corporations and the increasing use of technology around the world and the effect that has.”

Mr. Corbyn responded to reporters’ questions about whether they had discussed the European Union, saying they had “very briefly” done so.

A White House spokesman beefed up that statement, staying very much more on message after yesterday’s intervention by President Obama in the referendum debate, explaining that the two men “agreed that the UK should remain a member of the EU.”


President Obama visits Globe Theatre to mark Shakespeare anniversary:

As part of his final day in London President Obama earlier visited The Globe, a theatre dedicated to the work of William Shakespeare which is a replica of the circular, open-air theatre which he designed in 1599.

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - APRIL 23: US President Barack Obama is given a brief tour of the theatre by Patrick Spottiswoode, director of Globe Education during a visit to the Globe Theatre in London to mark the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare on April 23, 2016 in London, England.

President Barack Obama is given a brief tour of the theatre by Patrick Spottiswoode, director of Globe Education (Chris Radburn/WPA Pool/Getty Images).

President Obama marked the 400th anniversary of the playwright’s death by watching excerpts from ‘Hamlet’, including the famous “to be or not to be” soliloquy, which he described as “wonderful”.

It’s safe to say that security at the venue was somewhat stronger than usual.

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - APRIL 23: Armed police await the arrival of US President Barack Obama at the Globe Theatre on April 23, 2016 in London, England.

Armed police await the arrival of US President Barack Obama at the Globe Theatre on April 23, 2016 in London, England (Chris Radburn/WPA Pool/Getty Images).


President Obama is holding a ‘Town Hall’ style meeting in central London:

On his second full day visiting the UK, President Obama spent the morning visiting the Globe Theatre to see celebrations marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. Later today he will meet with Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

He is now speaking at a ‘Town Hall’ style meeting at the Royal Horticultural Halls, the precise details of which have been closely guarded, in front of a hand-picked audience of young British voters.

President Obama is telling a young crowd they are incredibly privileged to be standing at a moment where their “capacity to shape this world is unmatched” and that they have “never had better tools to make a difference, to forge a better UK and a better Europe and a better world.

He told them “to reject pessimism and cynicism, and that “progress is not inevitable” but requires struggle and perseverance and discipline and faith”.

Although he had earlier referred to historic differences, reminding the British audience “you burned my house down”, President Obama concluded his formal comments with a reference to the special relationship between the U.S. and UK:

“And as long as your generation nurtures that special relationship, and learns from one another and stands together, I’m confident the future is brighter than the past, and that our best days are still ahead of us.”

The audience included young activists from government, non-governmental organisations and the private sector who form part of the Young Leaders UK initiative run by the US government. President described them as “young leaders” and “change agents”. President Obama singled out some for praise.

Starting with Michael Sani, who set up Bite The Ballot, a group which hopes to ensure that “future generations grow up in a society that embraces diversity and difference; a country where every citizen is inspired to play an active role in democracy, and where everyone works collectively to make ‘-isms’ (classism, racism, ageism, sexism, fascism) things of the past.”

He also picked out Labour Councillor Ali Hashem — a child refugee from Syria who President Obama says now uses his elective office to help out others like him — and womens’ rights activist Becca Bunce.

One of the biggest and most revealing cheers came after a question from someone identifying himself as “Peter, from London”. He asked President Obama to imagine his successor at the White House coming to ask him a question about priorities in the future, continuing “and she says”. After the cheers and applause had died down for the obvious nod to Hillary Clinton, the young questioner added as an afterthought “suppose it could be Bernie.”

In response to a question about the peace process in Northern Ireland, he said he admires those in uniform, but added “we do them a disservice if we think that the entire burden of keeping the world safe is just place on those who are in uniform, that’s where diplomacy comes in.”

Expanding on the point he spoke of Iran being “on the path to obtain a nuclear weapon”, but said the world had made safer by “the hard diplomatic work that we did along with the UK and the EU and members of the Security Council” without engaging in a military strike.

Responding to a question about the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) he said that “getting trade deals done is tough because each country has its only parochial interests and factions”. President Obama added that people are especially suspicious of trade deals as they seem to be “accelerating some of these globalising trends that have weakened labour unions and allow for jobs to be shipped to low wage countries”, and in the past some of those criticism have been valid.

For him, the answer to globalisation and income inequality and lack of wage growth is to “make sure that in these trade deals we are embedding standards and values that help lift workers’ rights and help lift environmental standards and help fight against things like human trafficking and child labour.”

He spoke at length about trade deals with countries like Vietnam lifting their standards, but said the main issue between Europe and the U.S. are regulatory differences and “really irritating” light sockets.

A young questioner called Elijah asked President’s Obama what his legacy will be. He replied that it is hard to answer immediately, but that he does have things of which he is proud now, such as healthcare reform, stopping Iran getting a nuclear bomb and stopping the Ebola crisis becoming a global pandemic.

He also said he is proud of “saving the world economy from a great depression, that was pretty good.” Although the comment was met with laughter it was sincere and he expanded upon it saying that his actions in stabilising markets and reforming financial institutions prevented global economic meltdown.

He told his activist audience that change and progress takes a long time, in some cases hundreds of years, asking them not to “give up and succumb to cynicism is after five years poverty has not been eradicated and prejudice is still out there somewhere and we haven’t resolved all of the steps we need to reverse climate change.”

The next question came from Louisa, a self-proclaimed climate change campaigner who was at pains to thank the president for his “smart and creative ways of tying to sort of get a grip on the problem.” She asked him which campaigns had changed his mind in office.

President Obama cited the marriage equality movement and the “rapidity” with which it “changed the political landscape and hearts and minds and resulted in actual changes in law, it’s probably been the fastest set of changes in terms of a social movement that I have seen.”

He conceded that regarding LGBT rights in general he did not need persuading to change, having entered the White House ready to fight for several policies on that front. He told an audience diverse in race, faith and culture, many of which would not be supportive of gay rights, how he at first wanted civil unions. President Obama explained:

“My notion was initially that labelling those partnerships as marriage wasn’t necessary as long as people were getting the same rights, and it would disentangle them from some of the religious connotations that marriage had in the minds of a lot of Americans.

“I have to confess my children generally had an impact on me. People I loved who were in monogamous same-sex relationships explain to me what I should have understood earlier that it was not simply about legal rights, but about a sense of stigma, that if you are calling it something different it means that, somehow, it means less in the eyes of society.

“I believe that the manner in which the LGBT community described marriage equality as not some radical thing, but actually reached out to people who said they care about family values and said, if you care about everything that families provide, stability and commitment and partnership, then this is actually a pretty conservative position to take, that you should be in favour of this.”

President Obama then turned to other protest movements, including the Black Lives Matter movement. He said the movement is “really effective” bringing attention to “the problem of a criminal justice system that sometimes is not treating people fairly, based on race, or reacting to shootings of individuals by police officers.”

He went on to explain how they could now achieve their ends more effectively, saying:

“One of the things I caution young people about, though, that I don’t think is effective, is once you have highlighted an issue and brought it to people’s attention, and shined the spotlight, and elected officials, or people who are in a position to start bringing about change are ready to sit down with you, then you can’t just keep on yelling at them, and you can’t refuse to meet because that might compromise the purity of your position.

“The value of social movements and activism is to get you at the table, get you in the room and then to start trying to figure out how is this problem going to be solved? You then have a responsibility to prepare an agenda that is achievable, that can institutionalise the changes you seek and to engage the other side, and occasionally to take half a loaf that will advance the gainss that you seek, understanding that there is going to be more work to do, but this is what is achievable at this moment.”

To illustrate the point he spoke of the Paris Agreement on climate change, and the extreme stance of some activists.  He said:

“There are some climate activists who after the Paris agreement was signed said ‘this is not enough’, but they are not in a conversation apparently with the Prime Minister Modi of India who is thinking “I’ve still got several hundred million people without electricity and I have some obligation to try and relieve them of their poverty and suffering.”

Perhaps the most remarkable moment came towards the end of the meeting when a young audience member with a Pakistani Muslim background, which she said “inevitably has cultural implications”, came out as “non-binary” when asking a question about the recognition of transgender people in equality legislation. Te question of gender-neutral toilet facilities arose, to which President Obama responded:

“I can say from my perspective that we are taking a lot of serious steps to address these issues within the federal government.

“The challenge we have had is that in North Carolina, the law that comes up for example, that is a state law and because of our system of government I can’t overturn, on my own, state laws unless a federal law is passed that prohibits states from doing these things, and with the Congress I currently have, that is not likely to happen.”

Towards the end of the Town Hall meeting President Obama reminded the activists present their opponents are not necessarily bad people.

“You have to recognise that, particularly in pluralistic societies and democratic governments like we have in the United States and the UK, there are people who disagree with us.

“They have different perspectives. They come from different points of view and they are not bad people, just because they disagree with us. They may, in fact, assert that they have similar principles to ours but they just disagree with us on the means to vindicate those principles.”


Prime Minister David Cameron and President Barack Obama are now holding a joint press conference:

“Our two countries have been working together through some of the most difficult and troubled times,” said David Cameron, describing the UK-US partnership as “strong and essential” and adding it has never been more important.

He referred to the “immensely challenging” situation in Libya, the fight against Daesh (Islamic State), and the European migration crisis, saying they had discussed NATO’s contribution to the fight against people smugglers.

Moving on to the EU debate, the Prime Minister said the UK’s “collective power and reach is amplified by being a member of the EU”. He added that when it comes to the “special relationship” with the U.S. — for which he claimed there is “no greater enthusiast” than him — he’s “never felt constrained in strengthening that relationship” through the country’s membership of the EU.

David Cameron said he was honoured to have “Barack” as a “very good friend” to the UK, recalling a barbecue they held in Downing Street for servicemen. He also claimed President Obama had beaten him at table tennis — although the President corrected him and said they played as partners but were beaten by schoolchildren — and that he learnt the rules of basketball from him.

Referring to the EU referendum debate, Mr. Cameron said the UK’s “collective power and reach is amplified by being a member of the EU”. He said that when it comes to the “special relationship” with the U.S., he’s “never felt constrained in strengthening that relationship” by being in the politico-trading bloc. He also said that membership gives a powerful tool for the UK to deliver on prosperity, security and values.

President Obama also called David Cameron a friend and added that the Queen has been a “source of inspiration” for him, “truly one of my favourite people” and a “jewel to the world and not just the United Kingdom.” Describing her as an “astonishing person” he said that if he reaches 90 years of age he hopes to be as lively as her.

He went on to say the U.S. and UK standing together make people more secure and prosperous and the world a better place, saying together they stopped the spread of the Ebola virus, stopped Iran getting a nuclear weapon and pushed through the Paris accords on climate change.

He said it is vital that the U.S. and the UK keep working together in an international forum to tackle challenges that lie ahead.

President Obama said that they had discussed the EU referendum. He stressed that it is a decision for the British public, adding:

“But as part of our special relationship, part of being friends is to be honest. And speaking honestly the outcome of that decision is a matter of deep interest to the U.S. as it affects our prospects as well.”

In his opinion, the UK is “at its best when it’s helping to lead a strong Europe”.

Signalling his opinion on international cooperation, President Obama said that while he cherishes sovereignty, since World War II the U.S. also recognises it strengthens its security through bodies like NATO and that in the 21st century the nations with power will be the ones that act together.

Responding to questions President Obama said the UK would go to the “back of the queue” as regards trade deals with the U.S. if it leaves the EU. He conceded that a U.S./EU trade deal is “not going to happen any time soon” but that nevertheless they would focus on trade deals with the EU and other big blocs rather than a “hugely inefficient” one with just the UK.

European unity is not in crisis, says President, but is “under strain”. In part to do with the Eurozone’s financial crisis. “Temptation to pull up the drawbridge, either literally or figuratively” but “confident that the ties that bind Europe together are ultimately much stronger than the forces trying to pull them apart”.

The Prime Minister said it is up to Britain to decide its relationship with the EU, a “British choice” about “British membership of the EU”, not a German or French model, but it still “makes sense to listen to what our friends think”. To that end, he noted that President Obama made “such a clear statement” on trade.

Some are saying that President Obama has wrecked the Leave campaign’s central case.

However, Nigel Farage rejects that suggestion.

President Obama did use the opportunity to knock Boris Johnson’s criticism of him for removing the bust of Winston Churchill from the Oval Office. He said he loves Churchill and has a bust of him at the White House in his private office, the Treaty Room.

He said he did remove one from the Oval Office and replace it with Martin Luther King, but that was a comment on the progress made in civil rights not a criticism of the former British Prime Minister.

President Obama reiterated that the special relationship “will continue, hopefully eternally” even if the UK votes for Brexit.

In further questions President Obama was asked about transgender rights in North Carolina and Mississippi. He said they are great places with good people, but the laws passed there are wrong. In some cases the people passing them are good people, and he respects their different viewpoints, but he thinks it important not to send signals that people can be treated differently.

He was, however, in no doubt that if people visit North Carolina or Mississippi they will be “treated well”.


Pollsters Find Britons more influenced by Angela Merkel and the Queen than President Obama:

Leading research consultancy ComRes has conducted a poll for ITN News on the ability of specific leaders to influence the EU referendum debate.


What will the Prime Minister and the President be discussing?:

The talks at 10 Downing Street between the two political leaders are expected to look at: Operation Sophia, the EU’s naval mission dealing with human traffickers; Afghanistan; tackling terrorism by stepping up co-operation on data-sharing; and responding to Russia’s foreign policy in relation to Ukraine, including continued economic sanctions against certain Russians.

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 22: British Prime Minister David Cameron (R) speaks with US President Barack Obama as they meet at Downing Street on April 22, 2016 in London, England. The President and his wife are currently on a brief visit to the UK where they will have lunch with HM Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle and dinner with Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge at Kensington Palace. Mr Obama will visit 10 Downing Street on Friday afternoon where he is to hold a joint press conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron and is expected to make his case for the UK to remain inside the European Union.

LONDON, ENGLAND – APRIL 22: British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks with US President Barack Obama as they meet at Downing Street on April 22, 2016 in London, England (Peter Nicholls – Pool/Getty Images).

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, Home Secretary Theresa May and Defence Secretary Michael Fallon are also participating.


Critics slam Boris Johnson for attack on ‘part-Kenyan’ Obama:

This morning The Sun newspaper published a column by leading Brexit supporter Boris Johnson about President Obama’s intervention in the EU debate, in which the London Mayor alleged the U.S. President had an “ancestral dislike” of the British empire because he was a “part-Kenyan president.” Labour Party politicians were quick to attack Mr. Johnson for using inflammatory language.

Ms. Abbott’s colleague, Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, said Mr. Johnson’s comment was “yet another example of dog whistle racism from senior Tories.” Backbench Labour MP Chuka Ummuna, whose father was Nigerian, said the comments were “beyond the pale.”

The former Liberal Democrat leader, Lord Campbell said: “Many people will find Boris Johnson’s loaded attack on President Obama’s sincerity deeply offensive. If this is an illustration of the kind of diplomacy that we might expect from a Johnson leadership of the Tory Party then heaven help us. In truth this attack constitutes an unacceptable smear.”

Even fellow Tories turned on Mr. Johnson, most notably Winston Churchill’s grandson Sir Nicholas Soames MP. He told LBC radio the article was “completely idiotic” and “deeply offensive”, adding he likes to think it was written “by some little twerp who works for Boris” and not the London mayor himself.

In an unusual political intervention, retired voices from the Foreign Office establishment joined the chorus of dissaproval.

Baron Kerr of Kinlochard — Ambassador and British Permanent Representative to the European Communities/European Union in Brussels from 1990 to 1995 —  described Mr. Johnson’s comments as “typical bluff and bluster”. He defended President Obama’s right to speak up for U.S. interests, saying:

“The U.S. has an interest in Britain, its closest ally, being stronger, safer and better off in the EU – not weaker, out on its own.”

Sir Stephen Wall — Britain’s Permanent Representative to the European Union from 1995 to 2000 — described the language as “demeaning” to the referendum debate. He added:

“Using that type of language does not reflect Britain’s standing in the world or the country we aspire to be. As our most important ally, President Obama has the right to offer his view and he has made it clear that being in Europe magnifies British influence and enhances Britain’s global leadership.”


President Obama arrives for talks at 10 Downing Street:

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (L) greets US President Barack Obama (R) as Obama arrives for talks at Downing Street in central London on April, 22, 2016.

Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron greets US President Barack Obama as Obama arrives for talks at Downing Street in central London on April, 22, 2016 (JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images).

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 22: President Barack Obama arrives at Downing Street to meet with British Prime Minister David Cameron on April 22, 2016 in London, England.

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 22: President Barack Obama arrives at Downing Street to meet with British Prime Minister David Cameron on April 22, 2016 in London, England.

President Barack Obama arrives at Downing Street to meet with British Prime Minister David Cameron on April 22, 2016 in London, England (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images).


What do you give a Queen for her 90th?:

Well if you’re the President of the United States, the gift is a custom photo album of previous meetings with U.S. Presidents and First Ladies. The White House pool report offers some description:

“Prior to POTUS’ arrival during security sweeps at the Royal Farm (near the Royal Dairy, naturally) your pooler spotted what appeared to be the First Couple’s gift to Her Majesty, a square two- or three-inch thick rectangular box wrapped in gold paper embossed with the presidential seal. Attached to the lower right corner was a small white envelope with the words “White House” in the upper left corner, addressed to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, written in script.”

During Queen Elizabeth’s reign there have been 12 U.S. Presidents, of which she met 11 — only Lyndon Johnson missed out on meeting her.


Michelle Obama’s dress is a nod to a former critic, the late fashion designer Oscar de la Renta:

WINDSOR, ENGLAND - APRIL 22: Queen Elizabeth II (L) and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (R) stand with US President Barack Obama and First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama in the Oak Room at Windsor Castle ahead of a private lunch hosted by the Queen on April 22, 2016 in Windsor, England. The President and his wife are currently on a brief visit to the UK where they will have lunch with HM Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle and dinner with Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge at Kensington Palace. Mr Obama will visit 10 Downing Street on Friday afternoon where he is to hold a joint press conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron and is expected to make his case for the UK to remain inside the European Union.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh stand with US President Barack Obama and First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama in the Oak Room at Windsor Castle ahead of a private lunch hosted by the Queen on April 22, 2016 in Windsor, England. (John Stillwell – WPA Pool/Getty Image)

The fuchsia floral dress being worn by First Lady Michelle Obama is an Oscar de la Renta design. Observers have recognised the significance of this as the now dead fashion designer was a vocal critic of hers.

Mr. de la Renta admonished the First Lady for wearing an informal cardigan at her first meeting with the Queen in London in 2009, saying: “You don’t…go to Buckingham Palace in a sweater.”

It appears that Mrs. Obama took his advice on board and has dressed more appropriately for the Queen’s birthday lunch.


Nigel Farage says President Obama’s family see Britain as ‘foreign invaders’:

UKIP leader Nigel Farage MEP has been campaigning alongside the party’s London Mayoral candidate, Peter Whittle, in the City of London’s Leadenhall Market.

Although the focus of their activity was to promote the idea of making St. George’s Day a public holiday, Mr. Farage did speak to a Guardian journalist about President Obama’s intervention in the EU referendum saying he takes the president’s description of himself as a friend of the UK “with a pretty large pinch of salt.” He explained:

“Look, I know his family’s background. Kenya. Colonialism. There is clearly something going on there. It’s just that you know people emerge from colonialism with different views of the British. You know, some thought that they were really rather benign and rather good, and others saw them as foreign invaders. And Obama’s family come from that second school of thought and it hasn’t quite left him yet.”


A majority of British voters think President Obama should not intervene in the EU referendum:

Yesterday Sky News carried out their own Sky Data poll to gauge Britain’s reaction to President Obama’s visit. The reaction to his intervention was not positive.

Although 25 per cent of those polled overall suggested it may make them more likely to vote remain (as opposed to 17 per cent he puts off and 57 per cent who could not care either way), the President’s message is most well received by younger voters, in other words the demographic least likely to participate in June’s referendum.

Those surveyed were taken from Sky’s 10 million customers, and then weighted to make them representative.


UKIP MEP and Defence Spokesman calls President Obama ‘a hypocrite who doesn’t know his history’:

UKIP Defence Spokesman Mike Hookem MEP has called President Obama “a hypocrite who doesn’t know his history” after he used the twentieth century’s two world wars as an excuse for him to interfere in Britain’s EU referendum.

President Obama has suggested he can advise the British people how to vote because the U.S. and Europe’s history were “intertwined”, but former Commando Mike Hookem said there was something “sick” about using the dead to argue in favour of the EU. He added:

“If Mr Obama wants to bring up the U.S. involvement in the war, it might be timely to remind him that in 1939 the U.S. State department policy was to use the upcoming war as a way of smashing the UK’s influence in the world. When, in desperation, Britain asked for help they used Lend Lease to financially cripple the UK whilst palming off old and sub standard naval assets.

“And might I also remind Mr. Obama that after he entered office in 2008 his State Department was very clear as to his attitude to the UK. They said there was ‘nothing special about Britain’.

“‘You’re just the same as the 190 other countries in the world. You shouldn’t expect special treatment,’ he told us.

“With that in mind, might I kindly suggest that Mr. Obama’s interference in our democracy is unwanted, unwelcome and his historical inaccuracy is deeply insulting to the UK.”


Earlier today Tory government minister Dominic Raab highlighted President Obama’s ‘double standards’:

Dominic Raab MP, the Tory justice minister campaigning for Brexit, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that President Obama’s call for the UK to stay in the EU amounts to “double standards”.

“It is frankly wanton double standards because he is asking the British people to do something he wouldn’t dream of asking Americans. He wouldn’t dream of opening the US border to free movement from Mexico, he wouldn’t dream of allowing the American constitution to be trumped by a Latin American court with judges appointed by Venezuela, or Cuban judges.

“And his government right now is considering imposing security screening and new visa requirements on France, Belgium, Germany, Greece to protect the safety of American citizens. So I think Obama’s argument against Britain being able to take the power to take the same precautions is frankly absurd and we should politely but firmly say that whatever is good for the safety of American citizens must be good for the safety of British people.”


The Telegraph’s cartoonist Matt imagines an addition to today’s events:


The Spectator: ‘Obama’s Brexit overreach is typical of his arrogance’:

Writing for The Spectator, Tim Montgomerie has warned of the resentment President Obama’s intervention will cause:

The timing of his visit, halfway through the EU referendum debate, is no accident. There is a longstanding international understanding that world leaders don’t visit during election campaigns — but such conventions were obviously designed for lesser mortals. Obama has no qualms and the Prime Minister has no shame: he needs every endorsement he can get. The Chancellor is pulling all the strings he can so the likes of the IMF’s Christine Lagarde ask us to stay in. Short of engineering a Second Coming, a visitation from King Barack is to their minds the best plug imaginable…

…The arrogance is breathtaking but it is far from the only manifestation of, dare I say it, the madness of King Barack. Mr Obama does not let any adviser, voter or foreign leader get in his way. During his two-term presidency, his Democratic party has lost control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate. But King Barack was unimpressed at the verdicts of the people. By royal decree, or as the White House calls it, executive order, he has attempted to stop illegal immigrants being deported, increase the minimum wage, intensify gun regulation and cut greenhouse gas emissions.

All of these policies may be cheered from Europe. But the US constitution is quite clear: it’s the job of the House of Representatives and the Senate to pass laws and it’s the job of the President to either veto or implement them. There is a word for ignoring and overruling the legislative branches of the American government and that word is ‘undemocratic’.


The Queen has greeted President Obama after he flew into Windsor for lunch:

After flying in by helicopter, they were chauffered to lunch by the Duke of Edinburgh.


An artist’s impression of the President and the Prime Minister:

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 21: US President Barack Obama steps off Air Force One upon arrival at Stansted Airport on April 21, 2016 in London, England.

Political artist Kaya Mar (R) holds a painting as walks near 10 Downing Street in central London (ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images)


Former senior U.S. State Department official supports President Obama’s intervention:

James Rubin, a former senior U.S. State Department official told the BBC the President’s intervention is justified by “unique circumstance” explaining that:

“We have a saying: Friends don’t let friends drive drunk,”


President Obama’s Agenda For Today:

President Obama has lunch with the Queen at Windsor Castle to celebrate her 90th birthday.

3.30pm: President Obama arrives at Number 10 Downing Street to meet Prime Minister David Cameron.

4.50pm: President Obama and PM Cameron hold a press conference.

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