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Diddy Jr. Made UCLA Football Team Because of Millionaire Rapper Dad

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LOS ANGELES, California — It turns out P. Diddy’s son received a false start in his college football career. According to former UCLA Bruins head coach Rick Neuheisel, Justin was not recruited by the UCLA Bruins team based on his talent.

Neuheisel confessed on his Sirius XM radio show this week that being the son of a millionaire music and fashion mogul was a definitive factor in his decision to accept Justin onto the top 10 nationally-ranked college football team. Otherwise, his chances of getting on were, as he put it, “doubtful.”

“Justin is a great kid… His problem was his size. He’s not big enough to be a dominant player,” Neuheisel said on the radio. He said that while he believed Justin could be productive, “the fact his father was an influential guy played into my decision to go ahead and offer it.”

And if Justin was not P. Diddy’s son, would he be playing for UCLA? “Doubtful,” Neuheisel said on the program. Justin plays defensive back for the Bruins.

“When you’re weighing the assets of what a youngster can do for your program, there was no question that [being Diddy’s son] had something to do with it for me… I did recruit Justin Combs and Sean Combs as his father.”

Sean Combs was arrested on Monday and charged with three counts of assault with a deadly weapon after after he allegedly used a kettlebell to attack strength and conditioning coach Sal Alosi. He was also charged with one count of making terrorist threats, and one count of battery. Combs suggested he was acting out of “self-defense” in order “to protect himself and his son.”

It is unclear whether or not Justin would make it through to the end zone before he graduates.

Combs’ enterprise is adamant “that once the true facts are revealed, the case will be dismissed.” A court date has been set for July 13.

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