Politico Manifesto Revealed: Okay to ‘Get a Few Things Wrong’

Jim VandeHei, the Chief Executive at the left-wing Politico, released a “cultural manifesto” Monday, and in it VendeHei openly declares that speed is more important than getting it right. Under the subhead “Agility,” VandeHei tells his staff, ” Be impatient. Move fast as hell to try new things and adjust on the go. It’s better to move quickly and get a few things wrong then to think yourself into paralysis.”

Here’s the full quote:

It’s your job to help us constantly reinvent and sharpen ourselves by thinking what can be done better, smarter and more creatively. Be impatient. Move fast as hell to try new things and adjust on the go. It’s better to move quickly and get a few things wrong then to think yourself into paralysis. At the same time, don’t be afraid to fail. People will only experiment and take risks if they know they will not be punished for failing.

Yes, why would anyone punish someone for not getting something correct in the profession of journalism?

VandeHei’s main thrust in his manifesto is to continue the charade that his left-wing activist site is unbiased and objective. “Our common purpose,” VandeHei declares, “is to help save nonpartisan political journalism in a profitable and lasting way.”

Like much of the mainstream media, VandeHei understands that he can better further the dual-cause of electing Democrats and empowering the central government by disguising the left-wing Politico as “nonpartisan.” Politico is laughably presenting itself as “nonpartisan” even as it is joined at the hip with the openly left-wing MSNBC.

VendeHei’s left-wing agenda and lack of concern about getting it right all connect. A truly nonpartisan media outlet, or one with any kind of ethical standard, would not be okay with its staffers getting things wrong.

Leftists like VandeHei and his employees, however, see truth and accuracy as legitimate sacrifices to the cause of increasing the power of the federal government.

The Huffington Post has the full manifesto here.

 

Follow John Nolte on Twitter @NolteNC               

 


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