Coming This November: The Obama Economy That Couldn't

As we approach the November mid-term elections, voters “remain frustrated and unhappy” with the Obama economy. According to Politico, “By every measure in the survey, a gloomy mood still pervades the electorate when it comes to kitchen-table issues.”

That can’t be good for a Democrat Party that’s been in control of the White House going on six-years.

Only 23% of American feel their financial situation has improved over the last year, while 30% claim it’s gotten worse.

Democrats had initially envisioned 2014 as a year when their candidates could hail the fruits of an economic turnaround. For a time, a handful of impressive monthly employment reports bolstered their hopes. 

But while the economy has improved, it has not yet taken flight: Unemployment remains above 6 percent, and in August the country gained just 142,000 jobs. Candidates around the country have tempered their claims of economic improvement….

The item also points out that, as Obamacare has continued to fade in priority despite a GOP that had initally planned on focusing on it acutely, the economy, foreign affairs and immigration are providing the GOP with plenty of traction as they continue to build momentum toward taking control of the Senate in the Fall.

More than a third of voters identify economic issues, such as job creation and economic inequality, as their top concern in 2014 — the largest subset of issues weighing on the midterm electorate. 

But amid international instability and violence stretching from Ukraine to Syria and beyond, voters are also showing renewed interest in national security: 22 percent identified security, terrorism or foreign affairs as their top worries, up from just 6 percent in May. 

Meanwhile, the intensity of voters’ opposition to the Affordable Care Act — one of the most important drivers of the midterm debate earlier this year — has continued to fade over the course of the election cycle.


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