Fresh Rains Boost Eel River; Not Enough for Drought Relief

Fresh Rains Boost Eel River; Not Enough for Drought Relief

Northern California rains have temporarily boosted water running through the Eel River as drought continues to plague the state. However, acute water shortages in various regions of the state continue–the result of both natural and man-made scarcity.

Water flows through northern California’s Eel River in Mendocino County surged in the week of September 22, with the arrival of rains that feed into the thirsty waterway. In stark contrast to the prior week, which saw flows of 25 cubic feet per second, this past week saw flows of 198 cubic feet per second.

National Weather Service meteorologist Brian Garcia said, “There is a really weak system that will clip us on late Monday or Tuesday, but it doesn’t look like anything significant falling in Humboldt,” the Times-Stardard reported. He went on to say that though another dry month may lie ahead, the rain has made a difference.

Humboldt County lies northwest of Mendocino County, along California’s coast. The Eel River spans five counties, at approximately 196 miles in length. 

Extreme drought has come to California’s Central Valley as well–and human influence plays a large part, according to California Assemblyman Tim Donnelly (R-Twin Peaks) in a recent article for Breitbart News.

Farmers are suffering from the lack of water–and, consequently, so are all those that benefit from the farmers’ bounty in that region, including the rest of the state and country. 

Donnelly, a former gubernatorial candidate, blasted three bills that were eventually signed into law by Democrat Governor Jerry Brown on September 16, warning that the state government “will preside over the death of agriculture as the number one industry in our state.”

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