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Daddy, When I Grow Up Am I Going to Marry a Man or a Woman?

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For gay couples with children, the celebratory mood was amplified this past weekend following Friday’s Supreme Court ruling which effectively overturned any bans on gay marriage in America.

This Sunday, a Pride Parade took place in San Francisco where a plethora of children’s activities like face painting, drawing and snacks were made available.

Yet, some argue that the likelihood of confusion regarding sexual orientation is amplified when children are reared in homosexual households.

Elizabeth Hart of Oakland brought her four-year-old Son, Ronan, with her to the gay pride event. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, she is pregnant with a second child.

“I was explaining it to him about why people are celebrating. He has a lot of friends with two moms and understands that families are different,” Hart told the Chronicle. She reportedly helped Ronan sign one of five rainbow flags the group Marriage Equality USA intends to send to the five SCOTUS justices who voted to legalize gay marriage.

 

 

A study published in 2012 in the journal Social Science Research found that children who are raised by gay or lesbian parents tend to have more social and emotional problems than children who are raised in households where there is one mother and one father. Critics slammed back suggesting the study only provided evidence that children from broken homes — regardless of their parents’ sexual orientation — were likely to suffer.

For Katie Thompson-Peer and her wife Sarah with the same hyphenated last name, this was their first pride parade despite having lived in San Francisco for three years, the Chronicle notes. They reportedly brought their two-year-old son Evan with them and dressed him in a rainbow t-shirt. Sarah told the Chronicle that her partner Katie had to adopt their son “and we still worry about that when we travel.”

An article published by NPR recently details a “life partnership” between Iconic civil rights activist Bayard Rustin and his partner, Walter Naegle, 37 years his junior, which took place long before Friday’s landmark ruling by the Supreme Court.

And he was concerned about protecting my rights, because gay people had no protection. At that time, marriage between a same-sex couple was inconceivable. And so he adopted me, legally adopted me, in 1982. That was the only thing we could do to kind of legalize our relationship.

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