Dakota Meyer: Military Service Had ‘Nothing to Do with’ Dallas Shooting; Vets ‘Fought for the Values of the United States,’ Not Hatred

Medal of Honor recipient Dakota Meyer joined SiriusXM host Alex Marlow on Breitbart News Sunday to talk about Dallas shooter Micah Xavier Johnson, a military veteran who has been portrayed as potentially suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

“The big picture’s not really about if this is a veteran,” said Meyer. “I think the picture is, is what there’s these organizations out there doing, that are empowering these individuals to feel like they’re going to do the ‘right thing.’ I think that this person’s a veteran, it really has nothing to do with what is going on, in the situation that happened in Dallas.”

“I mean, this person wasn’t acting on behalf of the service,” Meyer continued. “He was acting on behalf of an organization that goes out and seems to — they say they don’t, but they seem to, everywhere they’re at, there’s violence. That’s the issue with putting those views out there.”

Meyer blamed the media for sensationalizing the police shooting incidents that fuel Black Lives Matter protests. “It’s like a game to them,” he said. “It’s like, you know, ‘Hey, let’s go out and make people feel this way.’”

“I’m sick of it,” Meyer declared. “Look, I fought for this country. I feel like I have as much skin in this country as anyone else does, and you know, like everyone who goes and wears the nation’s cloth — whether you’re serving overseas, or you’re serving behind the badge, or you go out and you put other people’s lives before yourself, and to serve other people, taking those risks every day.”

“When we were overseas, I fought next to African-Americans. I fought next to Hispanics. I fought next to every ethnicity there is,” he recalled. “I fought next to Republicans, I fought next to Democrats. Not one day did we go out there and say, ‘You know what? I’m going to fight for black people. Today I’m going to fight for white people. Today I’m going to go out and fight for Muslims, or Christians, or whatever it is, whatever you feel like your American-hyphenated is.”

“You know what we all went over to fight for? We all went over to fight for Americans. And you know what makes up being an American? African-Americans. Christians. Muslims. Hispanics. Every single one of them is what makes up an American,” he said. “I don’t understand why we have forgot that. Why are we segregating? We are more segregated now than we’ve ever been, across the board. Why?”

Marlow described the U.S. armed forces as “the largest, most productive peacekeeping force in the history of mankind,” echoing Meyer’s description of an integrated military team that includes soldiers from every race and creed, “all ages and races, sizes, shapes and colors, fighting for a common goal: the values of the United States of America, and defending innocent people abroad.”

And yet, as Marlow noted, left-wing academic culture denigrates the military and actively encourages segregation on campus.

“That’s the sick part of this,” Meyer agreed. “In the day that we forget that Americans are made up of Muslims, of Christians, of blacks, whites, of all these different people who come from different realms of the world — the day that we forget that’s what makes up an American, is the day that we bridge into a level of ignorance that is intolerable. And that is exactly what we’re seeing across the nation right now.”

He said that if some veterans are having a hard time returning to the U.S. after overseas deployment, it’s because of the strife they discovered upon their return.

“Do you think one day I went over there, and left my family, and we were standing there arm-to-arm, willing to take our views and our ideas overseas, to help other countries become safe, and to try to give them a great country — and come home to this?” he asked. “Do you think this is what we were fighting for? Absolutely not. Is this what the four names on my wrist died for? That’s what makes me sick.”

He added that what makes him even sicker is that “people are looking for hope,” but “our leadership in this country won’t come out and stop it.”

“They’re not people like us,” he said of the political leaders indulging this divisiveness. “They’re not people who have to go every day and accept responsibility. They’re not people who have to go every day and accept the same responsibilities in life that we do. Because they don’t know the life that we do.”

“When’s the last time you think Hillary Clinton had to go buy her own groceries?” Meyer asked. “When do you think she’s babysat the last time? When have they lived realistic lives that the majority of Americans do? How can someone like her go out, and say she’s going to represent people that she doesn’t even understand? Do you think she understands what our issues are? Do you think she understands what the American people face, every single day, as far as their issues and what we need help on? Do you think she does? No, she has somebody else doing it for her.”

He described Clinton’s support for Black Lives Matter as “unfortunate.”

“Look, every organization has its issues,” said Meyer. “Where’s Black Lives Matter in Chicago every day? Why is it only when there’s a police officer, a white police officer, or a police officer that takes arms and does their job, or they go out and something like this happens, are they there to chant and raise their arms.”

He defined terrorism as “use of violence in order to achieve a political, religious, or ideological aim,” then asked, “What does that sound like?”

“We’ve got to stop this,” Meyer urged. “We’ve got to stop fighting each other. We’ve got to stand together in arms, and we’ve got to come together. It’s not about being white, black, Hispanic. It’s about us coming together and putting our foot down and saying, ‘look, we all want to stand together as a nation, as Americans, because we want to go forward, and we all want to stand together as one, as a whole, and not a bunch of individuals.”

“We’ve all got to go out and hold ourselves accountable,” he continued. “We’ve all got to go out and recognize the issues, every single day. And we’ve got to go out and make sure we don’t go and promote these issues. We’ve got to go out and say and call it what it is… we’ve got to stand together, and with our arms together, with everyone… we’ve got to stand arm-to-arm, and we’ve got to stand shoulder-to-shoulder, not burning down streets and promoting violence.”

Meyer stressed that “everyone needs to be held accountable, from a police officer using his weapon with deadly force, to someone going out and promoting violence and burning down the street.”  

Dakota Meyer’s social media posts can be found on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Breitbart News Sunday airs from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Eastern time on Sirius XM Patriot Channel 125.

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