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Palin TV Show: Hunting Brings Peace, Fulfillment, Feeds Hungry

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Hunting is not only a sport or a way to get dinner on your plate–it can bring peace and fulfillment to one’s life, create jobs, and even help feed the hungry. That was the message of the latest episode of Amazing America with Sarah Palin on Sportsman Channel.

This exceptional installment of the program featured the dynamic Georgia Pellegrini showcasing her talents in the field and in the kitchen, plus an exclusive tour of Cinnamon Creek Ranch, one of America’s largest wild game processing facilities.

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Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin opened the show by saying “The best way to know where your meat comes from is to kill it yourself.” True. But, she also admitted that most of us may not always have the time for a big hunting trip.

So, Palin dispatched field host Tara Conner to Austin, Texas, to meet up with the remarkable Pellegrini, the modern-day pioneer who left a cushy job in investment banking for a life of hunting.

Pellegrini bolted from Lehman Brothers and went to culinary school. Now she is a super chef who knows how to live off the land. After some practice rounds on clay targets, Pellegrini takes Conner dove hunting. Pellegrini tells Conner that dove hunting is social hunting and she promises to make Conner a convert to the taste of the birds known as “flying livers.”

It wasn’t difficult. After both women blasted some doves, they went back to Pellegrini’s home to cook them. The dove rolls included bacon, goat cheese, and thyme for a little kick. Conner liked her’s so much she even took home another one in a doggie bag. Pellegrini revealed if you can’t bag any doves on a given day, chicken or quail from the grocery store works in a pinch.

Pellegrini contends that in a day and age when kids “know how to use an iPhone but can’t peel a carrot,” it is vital that we show people that wild game can be accessible. She wants young women to know it’s a good thing and relatively easy to be a modern pioneer. Her amazing biography speaks for itself, but the fact that she left excel spread sheets and big paychecks behind for doing what she loves is the real testimony.

Georgia’s message of modern pioneerism is so empowering to women everywhere,” said Palin. “We don’t need to rely on men or government or society’s institutions for our basic survival. We can do it on our own terms. That’s the definition of true freedom.”

Later in the show field host Jerry Carroll paid a visit to Cinnamon Creek Ranch, a wild game processing facility in Roanoke, Texas. Carroll was hooked pretty quickly. The impressive facility produces about fifty products from steaks to meatloaf to hamburgers.

They’re known for their sausages too and Carroll even got to try his hand at making some sausage himself from deer. Carroll’s senses were all on overdrive. He couldn’t get enough of the aroma of the smoke houses on site. Eventually he also got to taste test some jerky and other products. After a full day in “meat paradise,” Carroll stopped by the Cinnamon Creek Ranch archery center. Home of about 13-hundred bows, Carroll took a stab at archery skeet. After a few misses, Carroll exclaimed it’s “much harder than it looks!” But, he persevered and eventually connected.

While Cinnamon Creek Ranch certainly makes some tasty treats, they also give back in a big way. The staff regularly partners with Hunters for the Hungry, a group that feeds the needy. Carroll delivered meat to Hunters for the Hungry, clearly the most rewarding part of his big day.

Hunting is much more than just a fun way to enjoy the great outdoors. That’s the overwhelming theme of the latest Amazing America with Sarah Palin. Hunting can change lives. Hunting can help others. Georgia Pellegrini and Cinnamon Creek Ranch prove this.

Palin urges all Americans to follow their lead. “Go hunting for what makes us truly happy,” Palin said.

Amazing America with Sarah Palin airs Thursday nights on Sportsman Channel.


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