Tag: freedom of religion

Plano Sued for Allegedly Violating Texas Open Meetings Act

The Texas Open Meetings Act (TOMA) guarantees the state’s citizens fair, democratic, and open government where their voices are heard, banning local municipalities from hiding public business from the people, which is exactly what one north Texas couple alleges their city officials did in a lawsuit filed Thursday in Collin County District Court.

WATCH: Students Support Religious Freedom for Muslims, Not Christians

WATCH: Students Support Religious Freedom for Muslims, Not Christians

Several students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison admit that Muslims should not be forced by law to do business with Christians. Those same students, however, had a hard time agreeing that Christians or conservative Americans have the right to decline work that conflicts with their conscience or religion.

AP

Texas Health Center ‘Invites’ Employees Not to Reference ‘Christmas’

A health center in Texas has stirred controversy by sending their employees a memo that told them not to “use references to Christmas” around patients, including any signage. Instead, the CEO said “I invite you” to decorate public areas “in a more inclusive or neutral way.” Recognition of the “winter season,” or “Happy Holidays,” was suggested.

Sagemont Church Cross

Texas Pastors Slam Georgia’s Demand to Review Sermon Notes

HOUSTON, Texas — The head of a national and state pastors organization based in Houston said, “I can’t believe I’m saying this, but Georgia’s demand is even worse than when the Mayor of Houston demanded 17 different categories of materials, including sermons, from the seven of us.” The pastors say they are outraged about the State of Georgia asking for copies of a pastor’s sermons in litigation there.

AP Photo/J Pat Carter

Board: Judges Can’t Use Freedom of Religion to Avoid Performing Same-Sex Marriages

Citing the judicial oath of office to “support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of Ohio,” the opinion states, “A judge who is willing to perform marriages of only opposite-sex couples because of his or her personal, moral, or religious beliefs may be viewed as possessing a bias or prejudice against a specific class or group of people based on sexual orientation.”