Tag: racial discrimination

PROVO, UT - OCTOBER 25: People cast their ballots on electronic voting machines on the first day of early voting at the Provo Recreation Center, on October 25, 2016 in Provo, Utah. Early voting in the 2016 presidential election begins October 25 for Utah residents and is open until November …

DOJ to Oversee ‘Discriminatory’ Texas Town’s Elections for 6 Years

Just before city candidates will begin to sign up for running for office, a federal judge has issued a judgment and injunction prohibiting the City of Pasadena from using what she ruled was an unconstitutional redistricting plan. The municipality will also be placed under federal “preclearance” for six years–requiring Justice Department approval to any changes to election rules.

Early Voting 2016 - 1

Texas City’s Elections Under DOJ Oversight After Hispanic Discrimination Ruling

Pasadena, Texas, will be monitored by the Justice Department now that a federal judge has ruled that the City violated the Voting Rights Act by intentionally changing its city council districts to decrease Hispanic influence. The City, which the court ruled has a “long history of discrimination against minorities,” will have to get permission from the DOJ to make any changes in election policy going forward, otherwise known as pre-clearance.

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Community Organizer Obama Ready to Engineer Your Neighborhood According to Race

Just two weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, 5-4, in Texas Housing v. Inclusive Communities, that federal housing law allows challenges to zoning laws, lending regulations, and other practices that could impact minority groups – even without the intention to discriminate – the Obama administration has issued a final rule – known as the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Final Rule – in a press release.

Anthony Kennedy (Win McNamee / Getty)

Worse than Obamacare: Housing Case Lets Feds Target ‘Unconscious’ Racism

In the Obamacare case, the Court pretended to know what was really in the minds of legislators in spite of their explicit words (and evidence of their actual intent). In Texas Housing, the Court has ruled that the federal government can decide what is really in the minds of ordinary people, whether they intend to discriminate or not.