Tag: U.S. Supreme Court

Gregg Popovich Takes the Spurs to the Supreme Court

NBA teams seem willing to go anywhere in Washington, DC, other than the White House. The defending champion Warriors went to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, when they visited D.C. in February.

California Cities Sue Oil Companies over Climate Change

City attorneys in San Francisco and Oakland, California, sued five oil companies in two coordinated lawsuits on Tuesday, arguing that the courts should hold these companies responsible for climate change, and force them to financially compensate the cities for harm the plaintiffs claim those companies are causing to the planet’s environment.

REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

Texas Supreme Court Curbs Same-sex Marriage Benefits

The Supreme Court of Texas held that the U.S. Supreme Court opinion recognizing the right of same-sex couples to marry does not automatically entitle them to spousal employment benefits. The unanimous court held that the 2015 opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges did not address the right to tax, insurance, or other benefits–only the right to marry.

Refugee Organizations Raising Money off Travel Ban Reinstatement

Refugee organizations wasted no time in capitalizing on the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that stayed two lower courts’ rulings on President Trump’s temporary travel ban. The groups quickly used President Trump’s victory in temporarily banning travel from six Muslim-majority countries to send out fundraising messages.

Supreme Court Ruling Directly Affects Washington Redskins Team Name Controversy

As the U.S. Supreme Court continues to announce its decisions for its most recent session, the high court affirmed that Americans could trademark names even if they are “offensive” to some. The decision clears the way for the Washington Redskins to beat back claims that its name should not be allowed trademark status because some left-wingers are “offended” by it.

Texas Leads 16-State Coalition in Support of Travel Ban

Leading a 16-state coalition, the Texas attorney general filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday supporting President Donald Trump’s temporary travel stay. Attorneys general from 14 other states and the governor of Mississippi joined to urge the nation’s highest court to reinstate the executive order.

marriages

Texas Court Hears Case to Curb Gay Marriage Rights

The Supreme Court of Texas heard oral arguments today in a case where Houston taxpayers sued urging that subsidizing employment benefits for the spouse of a same-sex couple is illegal. Lawyers for the taxpayers describe the case as “the only one of its kind in the nation.”

Family Argues Mexican National Killed by Border Patrol Had Constitutional Rights

A Mexican family whose son was killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent told the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday that the agent violated their son’s constitutional rights by using unnecessary deadly force. A preliminary issue is whether the Constitution applies to someone who is not a citizen of the U.S. and was standing on Mexican soil at the time of the shooting.

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 27: Thousands of people rally on the National Mall before the start of the 44th annual March for Life January 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. The march is a gathering and protest against the United States Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

‘Jane Roe’ of Roe v. Wade Abortion Decision Dies in Texas Facility

A Texas woman who was the “Jane Roe” in the 1973 abortion case of Roe v. Wade died in a Katy assisted living facility on Saturday. Although Norma McCorvey, her real name, became famous for the part she played in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, she became a born-again Christian and spoke out against abortion.

Texas City’s Elections Under DOJ Oversight After Hispanic Discrimination Ruling

Pasadena, Texas, will be monitored by the Justice Department now that a federal judge has ruled that the City violated the Voting Rights Act by intentionally changing its city council districts to decrease Hispanic influence. The City, which the court ruled has a “long history of discrimination against minorities,” will have to get permission from the DOJ to make any changes in election policy going forward, otherwise known as pre-clearance.

SCOTUS

Texas Defends Mental Standards in SCOTUS Death Penalty Case

Another Texas death penalty case was argued at the United States Supreme Court this week. The two questions presented was whether executing someone 35 years after the imposition of a death sentence, and allegedly using outdated medical standards to determine intellectual disability, is cruel and unusual punishment prohibited by the U.S. Constitution. The Eighth Amendment prohibits executing those who are intellectually disabled.

Highest Military Court to Rule on Religious Liberty

Former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement and First Liberty Institute argued Wednesday before the military’s highest court on behalf of Monifa Sterling, who was court-martialed in part for posting Bible verses in her personal workspace.