US Requested ‘El Chapo’s’ Extradition 16 Days Before Infamous Breakout

One question regarding the infamous prison escape by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera has been addressed by Mexican authorities when they confirmed this week that prosecutors in the U.S. had asked for El Chapo to face drug charges in America.

This week, Mexican congresswoman Adriana Gonzalez, who heads the delegation that handles national security issues, spoke to the media and confirmed that if captured, Guzman Loera would be extradited to the United States, Mexico’s Proceso reported.

Gonzalez said the information was provided to her during a private meeting that he had with Mexico’s Secretary of the Interior Miguel Angel Osorio Chong, Mexico’s Attorney General Arely Gomez, and several other top officials to discuss the escape of the infamous drug lord.

During the meeting the security officials informed the group that about 16 days before the now famous escape by Guzman Loera, U.S. authorities had requested his extradition.

On June 25, U.S. officials on behalf of the U.S. attorney’s Office in the Southern District of California had made the request with Mexico’s Foreign Relations Office so he could face various drug charges over there, the politician told Proceso.

The confirmation that the U.S. wanted Guzman and the fact that he was able to get away likely with help from the inside appears to point to a pattern previously reported by Breitbart Texas  in which Mexican officials fear extraditing Mexican capos and corrupt politicians wanted in the U.S., such as the case of former Tamaulipas governors Eugenio Hernandez and Tomas Yarrington.

The pattern stretches back even further to the beginning of the year when then Mexico’s Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam appeared confrontational about his refusal to extradite the Mexican capo.

As previously reported by Breitbart Texas contributing editor and border-security expert Sylvia Longmire, Murillo Karam had previously dismissed questions about the potential for El Chapo to escape from prison, saying that the risk “does not exist.”

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