John Hayward

John Hayward

NEMURO, JAPAN - AUGUST 29: (CHINA OUT, SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this aerial image, Habomai Islands are seen on August 29, 2013 in Nemuro, Hokkaido, Japan. The southernmost Kuril Islands, where Japan have demanded the return from Russia. (Photo by The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)

Japan Protests Russian Detention of Fishing Boats near Disputed Islands

Hopes that 2019 might be the year Japan and Russia finally put World War II to bed were dealt a setback on Thursday when the Japanese Foreign Ministry formally protested Russia’s “unacceptable” detention of two Japanese boats that were fishing near the contested Kuril Islands.

Right to remain silent: A policeman yawns while standing guard outside the Beijing court where prominent Chinese legal activist Xu Zhiyong was sentenced to four years in prison for his role in organizing protests, furthering a crackdown on a rights movement he championed. | AFP-JIJI

Chinese Media Complains About ‘Clumsy, Droopy, Paunchy, Old’ Security Guards

China’s state-run Global Times published a scathing critique of Chinese security staff on Wednesday, deriding many security guards as poorly trained, out-of-shape, and too elderly for their demanding positions. Although it was only very briefly mentioned in the article, this concern was prompted by last week’s attack on a school classroom in Beijing.

Huawei founder denies spying for China in rare interview

Huawei Founder Praises Communism, Apple Computers, Donald Trump, and Immortality

Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei spoke to foreign reporters this week for the first time since his company concluded a disastrous year of cyber-espionage suspicions, bans by the United States and other governments, and Canada’s arrest of Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, who happens to be Ren’s daughter. Ren did some damage control for Huawei in his press engagements, striving to project optimism and stressing his corporate independence from the Chinese Communist government.

Pedestrians walk past a Huawei store in Beijing on December 28, 2018. - Chinese telecoms giant Huawei expects to see a 21 percent rise in revenue for 2018, its chairman said on December 27, despite a year of 'unfair treatment' which saw its products banned in several countries over security …

Taiwanese Institute Bans Huawei Phones for ‘Information Security’

The Industrial Technology Research Institute of Taiwan announced on Tuesday that smartphones and computers from China’s Huawei corporation will no longer be allowed to connect with its internal network. The ban was imposed “for the sake of information security.”

Flags of Canada and China are placed for the first China-Canada economic and financial strategy dialogue in Beijing, China, Monday, Nov. 12, 2018. (Jason Lee/Pool Photo via AP)

China Sentences Canadian Drug Smuggler to Death

The Dalian Intermediate People’s Court in China’s Liaoning Province sentenced Canadian Robert Lloyd Schellenberg to death on Monday. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau immediately condemned the sentence as “arbitrary” and said the Schellenberg case is “of extreme concern to us as a government.” Many observers speculated the swift and severe judgment is related to China’s ongoing dispute with Canada over the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou.

China says the USS Hopper, center in this 2009 file photo, was involved in a close encounter near a Chinese island in the South China Sea this week. File photo by Michael A. Lantron/U.S. Navy/UPI

China Threatens U.S. Freedom of Navigation Patrols with Anti-Ship Missiles

China responded to the latest U.S. Navy freedom of navigation patrol in the South China Sea by declaring it would “take necessary actions to protect state sovereignty” and touting its deployment of nuclear-capable ballistic missiles as a step toward doing so. Chinese state media pointedly described the missiles as “ship-killers.”

Iran's saffron seeks global recognition

Iran Enters Deep Recession, Admits 27% Unemployment

The government of Iran is prone to belligerent defiance about the resilience of its economy in the face of U.S. sanctions, but Radio Farda noted on Wednesday that even the dubious data officially released by Tehran depicts a country in “deep recession” with staggering unemployment rates.

In this Jan. 20, 2016, file photo, Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian waves at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany. Rezaian says he was arrested by Iranian authorities, subjected to a sham trial and held for 18 months purely as a way to gain leverage over the American government …

Former Iranian Hostage Jason Rezaian Testifies Against Iran in U.S. Court

Washington Post writer Jason Rezaian, who was held prisoner in Iran from 2014 to 2016, testified against the Iranian government in U.S. federal court on Tuesday. Rezaian is suing Iran for committing “unlawful acts of terrorism, torture, hostage taking, and other torts” against him and his family and seeks a multimillion-dollar settlement.

North Korea's Kim hails 'unity' with China in new visit

North Korean Dictator Kim Jong-Un Spends Birthday in China

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un made his fourth known trip to China on Monday at the invitation of Chinese President Xi Jinping. Kim made the journey by train, as is his habit, bringing most of the top North Korean Communist Party officials and his wife Ri Sol-ju along for the four-day excursion.

The Associated Press

Gene-Editing Chinese Scientist May Face Death Penalty

He Jiankui, the Chinese scientist who stunned (and horrified) the world by claiming he edited the DNA of unborn children to make them immune to HIV, is reportedly in state custody and may face the death penalty for his actions.