Left-Wing Youth Honored on Kennedy Assassination Anniversary: ‘This Border Doesn’t Mean Anything’

Democrat activist Kerry Kennedy observed the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of her father, Robert F. Kennedy, who died while running for president in 1968, by announcing the recipients of the annual awards given by the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a group she oversees. In this picture, David Hogg …
Facebook/Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights

Democrat activist Kerry Kennedy observed the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of her father, Robert F. Kennedy, who died while running for president in 1968, by announcing the recipients of the annual awards given by the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a group she oversees.

This year’s recipients were four youth-led groups, including some that promote radical ideology and are funded by left-wing adults.  These included the illegal alien-run United We Dream, Black Lives Matter-endorsed Color of Change, anti-gun rights March for Our Lives, and the International Indigenous Youth Council.

The keynote speaker was Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), who told the young people to get into “good trouble” and “necessary trouble”:

Other lawmakers attended, including Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD) and Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT).

The awards ceremony began with a member of the newly minted International Indigenous Youth Council D.C. chapter, who performed a Native American song after speaking to the crowd.

“We decided to write this song in recognition of the struggle of indigenous people and young people who come here from other places,” the young man said, sharing the belief that all people are related, “especially in the Western Hemisphere.”

“This border doesn’t mean anything,” he said. “It doesn’t mean anything to us. It doesn’t mean anything to y’all.”

“We’re all one hemisphere, and we’re all one people,” he said.

Kennedy, who was married to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, said her father died from “gun violence” and that the teenagers from Parkland, Florida, who were the face of the March for Our Lives rally in Washington, DC, that took place after a former student at a high school killed 17 people in February died from “preventable gun violence”:

Kennedy touted United We Dream, an organization run by illegal aliens who support amnesty for themselves and their parents, who broke U.S. law by bringing them into the country illegally, saying they “courageously came out of the shadows to share their immigration status at grave personal risk and led the fight for immigration reform.”

Kennedy said that for a decade the illegal alien group has been “forcing our country to confront the realities of our unjust policies.”

Kennedy added:

We cannot look at our children and say we are proud to be Americans when we take a child who came here in his infancy, made it through school, helped build our communities, fought in our wars, landed our [sic] job, made our country prosperous, and, in turn, we threaten that fellow American with deportation.

Maeve Kennedy McKean, Robert F. Kennedy’s granddaughter, presented an award to the International Indigenous Youth Council, which said the group was founded during the protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline in Standing Rock, North Dakota, that was planned on land near an Indian reservation.

McKean credited the group for “bringing the desecration of sacred lands into [the] national spotlight.”

Kennedy said the youth in the council “demonstrate their courageous and strong resistance against the oppressive colonial forces.”

In fact, Friday was the pipeline’s one-year anniversary in operation, and according to North Dakota’s Department of Mineral Resources, production in the state hit 1.16 million barrels per day, thanks in large part to the DAPL, Forbes reported.

And no incidents of any significance have been reported, according to the Forbes report, which called the pipeline’s safety record “impressive.”

Upon accepting the award, a member of the youth council explained why the group was founded at the pipeline protest and blamed adults for problems in Indian country.

“We didn’t want future generations to inherit the shit that we’ve been carrying around for the last 525-plus years,” she said, “because horrible things have happened to us.”

“As leaders and adults, it is your responsibility to ensure that you clean up the mess that you have made,” she said. “Do not teach children that you need to clean up something you yourselves have created.”

“You don’t depend on children to do the things that you should be doing,” she said.

Ironically, the entire ceremony and awards were focused on how youth are inspiring change in the country, from gun control and efforts to thwart U.S. energy production to anti-law enforcement movements and a push for amnesty for millions of illegal aliens.

“It is the young people who must take the lead,” Kennedy said.

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