Boris Expected to Return to Work Next Week After Recovering from Coronavirus

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures as he departs from Hudson Yards, in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019. In a major blow to Johnson, Britain's highest court ruled Tuesday that his decision to suspend Parliament for five weeks in the crucial countdown to the country's Brexit deadline was illegal. …
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to return to work next week following his recovery from Chinese coronavirus.

Prime Minister Johnson had caught the virus in March. After experiencing symptoms for ten days, Mr Johnson was admitted to Saint Thomas’ Hospital in London on April 5th, before being transferred to intensive care on the 6th.

Spokesmen confirmed that while in intensive care, Mr Johnson was not on a ventilator, but receiving oxygen therapy. After spending three nights in ICU, Mr Johnson was moved to a general ward from which he was released on Easter Sunday. Since April 12th, Mr Johnson has been convalescing at the prime minister’s country retreat of Chequers. First Secretary of State Dominic Raab has been deputising as the country’s premier.

Government sources have said that in recent weeks, the prime minister has been slowly increasing his workload. One source told The Telegraph: “The things he’s doing at the moment go way beyond steering the response to coronavirus. The Prime Minister has been asking for policy papers on other things, domestic and foreign, so he has increased his workload significantly.

“Everyone is expecting him back in Downing Street some time next week.”

Last week Mr Raab extended the lockdown measures for a further three weeks. It has been hoped that following that second lockdown and after Mr Johnson’s return to work, the prime minister would begin to lift restrictions. However, reports revealed that Mr Johnson has recently told ministers that all proportionate measures should be kept in place in order to avoid the risk of another wave of coronavirus.

A spokesman told The Telegraph: “The big concern is a second peak. That is ultimately what will cause the most damage to health and the economy, if there was an exponential rise once again in cases. The public will expect us to do everything we can.”

According to Johns Hopkins University, the United Kingdom has the sixth-highest number of total confirmed coronavirus cases, with 125,856 people infected. Globally, the UK has the fourth-highest number of deaths at 16,509, as of Tuesday.

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