U.S. Will Start Returning Asylum Seekers to Mexico on Friday

The Associated Press

The U.S. government will try to end most catch-and-release policies on Friday by sending asylum-seeking migrants back to Mexico pending their eventual court hearings in the United States, according to Reuters.

The new “Remain in Mexico” policy may sharply reduce the number of asylum-seeking migrants who are released into the United States — if the policy overcomes lawsuits filed before progressive judges.

In turn, the end of catch-and-release could prevent migrants from getting jobs needed to pay coyotes, so crippling the labor trafficking business, which is run by the criminal cartels in Mexico.

Currently, migrants and their children are legally allowed to walk up to the Ports of Entry on the border, ask for asylum, and then get released to legally find jobs until their asylum claims are heard in court, sometimes three years in the future.

Few of the asylum claims are subsequently approved by judges — but the catch-and-release process allows migrants to legally earn money, pay their debts to the coyotes, re-hire coyotes to smuggle their familiy members over the border, and then evade immigration enforcement once they lose their asylum claim.

Reuters reported from Mexico:

The United States will return the first group of migrants seeking asylum in the United States to the Mexican border city of Tijuana on Friday, a spokesman for Mexico’s president said on Thursday.

In a major policy change, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration said on Dec. 20 it would send non-Mexican migrants who cross the U.S. southern border back to wait in Mexico while their U.S. asylum requests are processed.

Democrats are expected to openly oppose the new policy because it will reduce the inflow of migrants, even though it will not prevent migrants from seeking asylum. Progressives are already arguing that Mexico is not a safe place for asylum seekers to wait until their court date in the United States.

The policy may prove far more powerful than a full border wall, partly because it allows officials to block the catch-and-release of asylum seekers who legally present themselves at the Ports of Entry.

The policy will also help border officers block drug smuggling and illegal immigration by freeing resources to pursue drugs and illegals, instead of having to process asylum seekers, including many migrants who bring children to trigger the catch-and-release loopholes.

The Mexican government has suggested it will support the Remain in Mexico policy, partly by allowing migrants to get jobs in Northern Mexico.

Nationwide, the bipartisan establishment’s economic policy of using legal migration to boost economic growth shifts wealth from young people towards older people by flooding the market with cheap white-collar and blue-collar foreign labor. That flood of outside labor spikes profits and Wall Street values by cutting salaries for manual and skilled labor of blue-collar and white-collar employees.

The cheap labor policy widens wealth gaps, reduces high tech investment, increases state and local tax burdens, hurts kids’ schools and college education, pushes Americans away from high tech careers, and sidelines at least five million marginalized Americans and their families, including many who are now struggling with fentanyl addictions.

Immigration also steers investment and wealth away from towns in Heartland states because coastal investors can more easily hire and supervise the large immigrant populations who prefer to live in coastal cities. In turn, that investment flow drives up coastal real estate prices, pricing poor U.S. whites, Latinos, and blacks out of prosperous cities, such as Berkeley and Oakland.

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