Kerry on Iran: ‘No Nation is Going to Consider Itself Nuclear Capable with One Bomb’

AFP PHOTO / POOL / SAUL LOEB
AFP PHOTO / POOL / SAUL LOEB

Secretary of State John Kerry told members of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs today that Iran possessing a nuclear weapon would not make it a nuclear-armed nation, because “no nation is going to consider itself nuclear capable with one bomb.”

During his opening statement, Kerry attempted to assure the committee this is the right path to take with the regime, even if they eventually do develop one nuclear bomb with the restrictions.

He claimed that the country “is permanently barred from pursuing nuclear weapons” under the new deal. The deal says the regime may continue its nuclear enrichment program for eight years. It also limits its supply of enriched uranium to 300kg and their research and development. Yet, if Iran manages to develop a bomb, Kerry believes “no nation is going to consider itself nuclear capable with one bomb.”

“The fact is, it’s a lot easier to push back against an Iran that doesn’t have a nuclear weapon,” he continued.

Kerry insists the Iran deal keeps the regime’s nuclear program under intense scrutiny. However, the details state international inspectors will only have very limited access to nuclear sites. Inspectors can only visit Parchin once. They must provide a 24-hour notice before they visit other nuclear sites.

Kerry told the committee he understands Israel’s “fears of the Iran deal,” but truly believes the agreement makes Israel safer. He reminded members when he was senator he always voted for Israel.

Israel has prominently objected to the agreement. Since Iran agreed to the deal, the United Nations Security Council dropped sanctions against the regime. Some Israelis view this as more dangerous than the regime’s nuclear program.

“The deal will give Iran billions in cash and sanctions relief to fuel its terror and war machines, shred the hard-won sanctions regime beyond repair, and enable the Iranians to get away with hiding the full extent of their nuclear work, infrastructure, and know-how,” said Josh Block, President and CEO of the Israel Project. “It will not have an enforceable inspections regime or a workable way to re-impose pressure on Iran when it cheats.”

Republicans in Congress do not approve of the deal.

“The Iranian regime and the world should know that a majority of members in this Congress do not support this deal and that the deal could go away on the day President Obama leaves office,” Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) told Kerry at the last hearing on the deal. “The Iranian regime and the world should know that a majority of members in this Congress do not support this deal and that the deal could go away on the day President Obama leaves office.”

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