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Oil theft ‘costing Libya over $750 mn annually’

A Libyan official points at oil onboard a tanker seized off the coastal city of Zuwara for fuel smuggling, on April 29, 2017
AFP

Tripoli (AFP) – Fuel smuggling is costing Libya more than $750 million each year and harming its economy and society, the head of the National Oil Company in the conflict-riddled country said.

“The impact of fuel smuggling is destroying the fabric of the country,” NOC president Mustafa Sanalla said according to the text of a speech delivered on Wednesday at a conference on oil and fuel theft in Geneva.

“The fuel smugglers and thieves have permeated not only the militias which control much of Libya, but also the fuel distribution companies which are supposed to bring cheap fuel to Libyan citizens,” he said.

“The huge sums of money available from smuggling have corrupted large parts of Libyan society,” he added. 

The backbone of the North African country’s economy, Libya’s oil sector collapsed in the wake of the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Moamer Kadhafi.

Before the revolt Libya, with estimated oil reserves of 48 billion barrels, used to produce 1.6 million barrels per day (bpd).

But output fell to less than 500,000 bpd between 2014 and 2016 due to violence around production facilities and export terminals as rival militias fought for control of Africa’s largest crude reserves.

No oil was exported from Libya’s main ports until September 2016 with the reopening of the Ras Lanuf terminal in the country’s so-called oil crescent.

The recovery of oil production and exports is key to restoring Libya’s moribund economy.

Sanalla urged Libya’s “friends, neighbours but above all the Libyan people themselves… to do everything they can… to eradicate the scourge of fuel theft and fuel smuggling”.

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