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The Latest: Ethel Kennedy joining protest hunger strike

The Latest: Ethel Kennedy joining protest hunger strike
The Associated Press

MCALLEN, Texas (AP) — The Latest on immigrants parents and children separated at the U.S. border (all times local):

9:50 a.m.

The 90-year-old widow of Robert F. Kennedy plans to take part in a hunger strike to protest the separation of immigrant families.

The Boston Globe reports Ethel Kennedy plans to join several dozen members of the family and other activists, who each plan to fast for 24 hours and make a donation in place of the food they would have eaten.

The organization Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights is holding what it calls a “hunger strike and prayer chain” over a 24-day period to honor an estimated 2,400 children separated from parents because of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy for immigrants who enter the U.S. illegally at the Mexican border.

Kerry Kennedy, who heads the organization, says her mother is “very joyful” about participating in the protest.

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8:50 a.m.

Washington state authorities say 10 protesters were arrested Tuesday night outside the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, where detainees from the southern border crisis are being held.

In the on-going protest, Tacoma police said 40 people started blocking the road into the prison about 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Protesters who stood in front of a Tacoma police officer’s patrol car refused to move.

That prompted a large police response with 25 officers.

One protester who jumped onto the back of an officer was arrested for assault, while the others were taken away for resisting arrest or failing to disperse.

Tacoma police said about 160 people had gathered to protest the federal government for detaining migrants — separating them from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border — while the adults await immigration processing.

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8:20 a.m.

The clock is ticking for the Trump administration after a federal judge ordered thousands of migrant children and parents reunited within 30 days, sooner if the youngster is under 5.

The hard deadline was set Tuesday night by U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego after President Donald Trump’s order ending the separation of families at the Mexican border gave way to days of uncertainty, conflicting information and no guidance from the administration on when parents might see their children again.

The order poses a host of logistical problems for the administration, and it was unclear how it would meet the deadline.

Health and Human Services, which takes charge of the children, referred questions to the Justice Department.

The Justice Department said the ruling makes it “even more imperative that Congress finally act to give federal law enforcement the ability to simultaneously enforce the law and keep families together.”

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