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Rep. John Lewis: ‘Cannot Be Any Peace in America’ Until Child Border Policy Ends

WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) speaks during a protest June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. Democratic congressional members joined actives to protest "the Trump administration's policy to separate children from their parents at the border." (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) told reporters Wednesday there “cannot be any peace in America” until border agents cease the separation of immigrant families.

“It made me so sad,” Lewis began. “I cried last night. When I heard those babies crying. Knowing that young children have been taken from their mothers.

“Some of these young children may never, ever see their mothers or their fathers again.”

“That’s not right!” the Congressman continued. “There cannot be any peace in America until these young children are returned to their parents.

“It doesn’t matter if we are black or white, Latino, Asian-American or Native-American. We are all one people, one family. We all live in the same house. Not just America’s house, but the world house,” Lewis said.

The lawmaker then offered to travel to the southern border, dismissing fears of being arrested.

“I will go to the borders. I’ll get arrested again,” he said to pro-amnesty Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-IL).

“If necessary, I’m prepared to go to jail.”

The media is in overdrive this week reporting that the overwhelming majority of minors being taken from adults have resulted in the separation of immigrant families. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen debunked such claims ahead of Monday’s White House press briefing, clarifying the “vast, vast majority” of the 12,000 minors detained by federal authorities were brought to the border by human traffickers.

“So I want to be clear on a couple of other things,” said Nielsen. “The vast majority, vast, vast majority of children who are in the care of HHS right now — 10,000 of the 12,000 — were sent here alone by their parents.”

The Justice Department introduced in April a “zero-tolerance” immigration policy aimed at curbing illegal border crossings, resulting in nearly 2,000 minors being separated from adults between April 19 and May 31.

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