NFL Bans the Oklahoma Drill, Other Traditional Contact Drills

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DYLAN GWINN

The NFL just took another giant step towards becoming a no-contact offseason league this week by asking teams to stop utilizing high-impact training camp drills.

Specifically, the league has asked teams to stop using the Oklahoma drill, Bull in the Ring, and several other drills that emphasize collision.

The league announced their decision on Tuesday, during its spring meetings in Florida.

The league convened a group of former players and coaches to address data which showed a growing number of concussions in recent years, specifically in the early part of training camp. Just over a month after having met for the first time, the group emerged with their recommendations to scale back contact drills in training camp.

The Oklahoma Drill in particular, has become a favorite for the NFL Network and the HBO series Hard Knocks.

According to ESPN, “The Oklahoma drill, among others, has been used far less frequently in recent years, but its history is rooted in reacquainting players with full contact after the offseason.

“It pits a defender against a blocker who is trying to make room for a ball carrier. Teammates and coaches usually surround the drill area to create a battle-type atmosphere.”

Of course, the players will still have to go through some type of drill to prepare them for the actual hitting that takes place in an NFL season. Though, at this rate, one wonders how much longer there will be hitting in the NFL.

Follow Dylan Gwinn on Twitter @themightygwinn

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