RFS

AP Photo

EPA Requires More Ethanol Into Less Gasoline

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS)—also known as the ethanol mandate—was passed by Congress in 2005 and expanded in 2007. Regardless of market conditions, it required ever-increasing quantities of biofuel be blended into the nation’s gasoline supply—though the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does have the flexibility to make some adjustments based on conditions, such as availability and infrastructure. At the time of its passage, it was unfathomable that a decade later Americans would be consuming less gasoline, not more.

AP Photo

Will 2015 Be the Year of Renewable Fuel Standard Reform?

That the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee attacks the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) management—er, mismanagement—of the federal renewable fuel standard (RFS) indicates the growing frustration over both the agency and the RFS itself.

AP Photo/Toby Talbot

A Bad Time for the Renewable Energy Industry

The year 2015 may go down as when support for renewable energy flipped. Policy adjustments—whether for electricity generation or transportation fuels—are in the works on both the state and federal levels.

Ted Cruz

Cruz Applauded for Rejecting Ethanol Subsidies at Iowa Ag Summit

Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) attended the Iowa Ag Summit over the weekend, along with several other prospective 2016 Republican presidential candidates, and was alone among attendees in his outright rejection of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), the ethanol subsidies that have a significant impact on Iowa’s agricultural economy. Despite the risk of opposing the RFS at an event sponsored by the agriculture industry in a critical early primary state, Cruz was unequivocal in voicing his opposition to the RFS and the crowd applauded his comments.