Report: Lance Armstrong May Confess to Doping if Granted Immunity from Perjury Prosecution

Cyclist Lance Armstrong has told his close associates that he may admit to having doped so long as the U.S. Justice Department grants him immunity from potential perjury prosecutions.

Armstrong, who had repeatedly insisted he never doped or cheated during The Tour de France competitions, in order to preserve his squeaky-clean image, has given sworn testimony, under oath, denying he had ever doped. If he admits that he had, he could be charged with perjury.  

According to the New York Times, Armstrong, "who this fall was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles for doping and barred for life from competing in all Olympic sports," reportedly "has told associates and antidoping officials that he is considering publicly admitting that he used banned performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions during his cycling career, according to several people with direct knowledge of the situation."

Armstrong would do so in order to "restore his eligibility so he can resume his athletic career" since Armstrong "has hopes of competing in triathlons and running events," which are "often sanctioned by organizations that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong received his lifetime ban."

Antidoping experts told the Times that under that code, "an athlete might be eligible for a reduced punishment if he fully confesses and details how he doped, who helped him dope and how he got away with doping. But a reduced lifetime ban might decrease only to eight years or four, at best."

Two of Armstrong's associates told the Times Armstrong would only publicly admit he cheated if he is assured he will not be prosecuted for lying under oath. 











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