Israel Unearths 2,100-Year-Old Wine Press At Elementary School Construction Site

In this handout photo provided by Israel Antiquities Authority, Workers labor at archaeological excavations that uncovered a 1,800 year old bathing pool on November 22, 2010 in Jerusalem, Israel. The discovery was made in the area where a miqve or male bath is to be built. (Photo by Shlomi Amami/Israel …
Shlomi Amami/Israel Antiquities Authority via Getty

The Algemeiner reports: JNS.org – An archaeological survey by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) in preparation for the construction of a new elementary school in the city of Ashkelon has revealed a 2,100-year-old wine press dating back to the Hellenistic Period.

Alongside the wine press, which is the oldest one ever found in the area, excavations uncovered the remains of a large building. The findings appear to indicate that the location previously housed a large farm.

The square wine press consists of a flat surface where people trampled wine grapes with their bare feet to extract the juice, a pit used to separate the grape skins from the grape juice, and a collecting vat into which the filtered grape juice was piped. All sections of the press were covered with a thick layer of white plaster mixed with seashells to prevent the liquid from leaking out.

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