Justice Ginsburg: I Will Not Retire from the Supreme Court Anytime Soon

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 30: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, celebrating her 20th anniversary on the bench, is photographed in the West conference room at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Friday, August 30, 2013. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg announced Friday that she would not retire from the Supreme Court anytime soon.

“My answer is as long as I can do the job full steam, I will do it,” Ginsburg told supporters at an Equal Justice Works event.

“I used to have an answer; it worked for a lot of years. It was Justice [Louis] Brandeis when he was appointed. He was the same age as I was, 60. And he stayed for 23 years, so I expect to stay at least as long. Well, now I’ve passed Brandeis, I’ve passed [Justice Felix] Frankfurter,” she added.

Ginsburg, also known as the “Notorious R.B.G” among her supporters, has served on the court for 24 years since former President Bill Clinton appointed her in 1993.

The justice’s liberal supporters hope she will stay on the court throughout the Trump administration.

Despite observers concerns that she does not have the energy to continue in her position, Ginsburg shows no signs of slowing down.

The 84-year-old justice has hit the interview circuit in recent months, sitting down with CBS’s Charlie Rose in September to claim “sexism” played a role in the 2016 election.

She added that there was “no doubt” it led to former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s loss.

Ginsburg also bashed President Trump as a “faker” when he was a candidate in the 2016 election and criticized him for not releasing his tax returns. She later apologized for the remarks.

Ginsburg has been pretty adamant about not retiring from the Supreme Court despite her age. The reliably liberal justice declined to announce her retirement at the end of the last Supreme Court term in June.

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