Investigative Record Lists Second ‘Person of Interest’ In Las Vegas Shooting

TOPSHOT - The damaged windows on the 32nd floor room that was used by the shooter in the Mandalay Hotel after a gunman killed at least 58 people and wounded more than 500 others when he opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 2, …
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

Documents unsealed on Tuesday show that investigators listed Douglas Haig as “person of interest” in the October 1, 2017, Las Vegas shooting.

That attack took the lives of 58 concertgoers and resulted in hundreds more being injured.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that more than 300 documents related to the shooting were unsealed by court order on Tuesday.  They contacted Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo, pointing out that Douglas Haig’s name was included in the documentation but had yet to be named publicly. Lombardo’s response: “If you’ve got it, publish it.”

The Las Vegas attack has launched conspiracy theory after conspiracy theory, as well as some genuine concern that Paddock was not the only gunman involved. The mention of Haig’s name may serve to fuel such speculation.

Lombardo spoke to the number of shooters, saying, “I know and believe there was only one suspect who killed 58 people and injured hundreds more. All the evidence recovered in this case supports that theory. There was one shooter in the 1 October massacre. There was only one person responsible, and that was Stephen Paddock.”

The changing timeline of events surrounding the October 1, 2017, attack has only fueled the conspiratorial fire. On November 23, 2017, Breitbart News reported:

At first, reporters at law enforcement press conferences were told that the gunman shot Mandalay Bay security guard Jesus Campos after the attack on concert-goers was already underway. Then the timeline shifted and reporters were told that Campos was actually shot by Paddock six minutes before the attack began. They were told that another hotel employee, Stephen Schuck, said shots were fired at him in the hallway right after Campos was shot and CBS News reported that Schuck immediately radioed “hotel dispatchers to call police,” telling the  dispatcher, “a gunman had opened fire with a rifle inside” the hotel.

MGM Resorts International, the group which owns Mandalay Bay, immediately questioned the new timeline. On October 11 the AP quoted MGM Resorts spokeswoman Debra DeShong saying, “We cannot be certain about the most recent timeline. We believe what is currently being expressed may not be accurate.”

The new timeline was irksome for MGM Resorts and law enforcement because it made it appear that the shooting could have been prevented or at least cut short if the calls to the dispatcher had been passed on with greater urgency and/or if police response had been faster.

On October 20 CNN reported Sheriff Lombardo announced that the timeline was being shifted back to what had originally been announced: that “Paddock shot a hotel security guard around the time he began firing on the crowd, not six minutes earlier.”

Lombardo anticipates a “final report” on the heinous attack to be released by the end of this calendar year.

AWR Hawkins is an award-winning Second Amendment columnist for Breitbart News, the host of the Breitbart podcast Bullets, and the writer/curator of Down Range with AWR Hawkinsa weekly newsletter focused on all things Second Amendment, also for Breitbart News. He is the political analyst for Armed American Radio. Follow him on Twitter: @AWRHawkins. Reach him directly at awrhawkins@breitbart.com. Sign up to get Down Range at breitbart.com/downrange.

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