4 Voters Claim NPR as Residence, Identified in California Voter Record Review

FILE - This April 15, 2013 file photo shows the headquarters for National Public Radio on North Capitol Street in Washington. On Friday, June 12, 2020, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting NPR wants people to burn books written by white people. A story published on …
AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

Four voters who claimed the National Public Radio (NPR) West headquarters as their residence and voted in 2018 via mail-in absentee ballots have been identified in a review of California’s voter registration and voting history records.

The discovery was made by the Public Interest Legal Foundation as it conducted a review of the Golden State’s voter registration and voting history records as it matched nonresidential addresses.

The names of those four individuals, according to Hans A. von Spakovsky, are Juan Ramon Beristain, Isabella Beristain, Carrie Jane Kahn, and Anjuli Sastry.

“Neither Beristain’s name appears in a search of the NPR website, and their affiliations with the left-leaning public broadcaster aren’t clear,” Spakovsky noted in his analysis of the situation.

Additionally, Spakovsky said that Kahn “is listed as an international correspondent based in Mexico City.” According to Kahn’s biography on the website, she works with NPR programs such as All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.

Throughout the investigation into the matter, it was also revealed that Sastry is listed in her biography as “an associate producer at WAMU (88.5), the NPR station owned by American University in Washington, D.C.” The biography also states that Sastry also worked on All Things Considered.

“But according to the voter registration form that Sastry had to have completed under oath when she registered to vote, she lives 2,680 miles away from the nation’s capital at the NPR West building in Culver City,” Spakovsky claimed.

Spakovsky also highlighted legal punishment for those that make a “false statement on a voter registration form.”

“Making a false statement on a voter registration form—such as claiming that a commercial building where you work is actually your residence—violates Section 1015 (f), a felony punishable by a maximum of five years’ imprisonment and a fine of up to $250,000, or both,” Spakovsky said.

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