FEMA Sends Only 60 Generators to Texas During Power Crisis

KILLEEN, TEXAS - FEBRUARY 18: Icicles hang off the State Highway 195 sign on February 18, 2021 in Killeen, Texas. Winter storm Uri has brought historic cold weather and power outages to Texas as storms have swept across 26 states with a mix of freezing temperatures and precipitation. (Photo by …
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FEMA has delivered only 60 generators to assist Texas residents, even though hundreds of thousands remain without power for the sixth day in a row.

President Joe Biden’s homeland security advisor Liz Sherwood-Randall said Thursday that FEMA had sent 60 generators to assist Texas localities without power.

“Specifically, in Texas [FEMA] has made 60 generators and fuel available to support critical sites like hospitals and water facilities,” Sherwood-Randall said during the White House press briefing, even as she acknowledged that 600,000 people in the state of Texas remain without power.

Earlier in the week, as many as eight million residents in the south-central part of the country and even in Mexico were without power after a freezing winter storm hit the region.

A spokesperson for FEMA told Breitbart News they had not received any additional requests for generators.

“FEMA has provided the state of Texas with 60 generators,” the spokesperson from FEMA said. “We have not received any additional requests from Texas for generators.”

A request for comment from Texas Gov. Greg Abbott’s office was not returned.

Sherwood-Randall warned during the briefing that rolling blackouts in the state would continue.

“It’s important to set expectations however, that due to the nature of the storm citizens will continue to experience rolling power outages in some communities,” she said. “And that is just part of the process of trying to get power online and to get it delivered where it needs to go.”

Sherwood-Randall said that FEMA continues to distribute 729,000 liters of water, more than 10,000 wool blankets, 50,000 cotton blankets, and 225,000 meals.

She added that in the future, the federal government would work with states and localities to address critical problems with the country’s electrical infrastructure.

“We know we can’t just react to extreme weather events. We actually need to plan for them and prepare for them,” she said.

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