Washington Post: Herman Cain Is Bull Connor

Anyone who either remembers or has ever studied Civil Rights history knows what an evil figure Democrat and Klansman Bull Connor was. Connor abused his office when he allowed Klansmen to attack Freedom Riders; the imagery of his use of firehoses and attack dogs against civil rights activists remains one of the most iconic images in the fight for equality. Now, the Washington Post has attempted to harness this bully power to attack black Republican Herman Cain by portraying him as Connor in a video.


The Washington Post would have been more accurate in this case to present itself as Bull Connor and its biased media coverage and affront to black conservatives as the firehoses and German Shepherds depicted in the photography from the infamous Freedom Ride attacks.

These tactics are used again and again any time a black American steps out as a conservative. Entities like the Washington Post slip on their white, cotton hoods and attempt to scare black conservatives back to the confines of the Democratic plantation; black conservatives are called “Uncle Toms,” “N——“; the New York Times most recently accused Cain of “minstrelsy.” They ignore actual acts of racism against black Americans because they participate in them.

The media is terrified of Herman Cain because he is black. They’re terrified that he is a black conservative. They don’t attack his policy, they don’t debate him on the merits of his principles, they go after his skin color. They try to neutralize him in ways reminiscent of Democrats from the 50s and 60s. Because they’ve gambled away morality, because they’ve chipped away at character, the only thing they have left is identity politics. If they lose this, their racist card, they will have lost everything. So they’re digging in to protect it, even if doing so is antithetical to the “equality” they preach. Diversity in ethnicity is fine, diversity in thought is criminal.

No, if an homage to Bull Connor is to be identified, it is the American mainstream media.

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