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James P. Pinkerton

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Mike Pence, Donald Trump

James Pinkerton – The October Surprises: Donald Trump and Mike Pence Remind Us that This Is a Change Election 

1. The October Surprise

Remember the “October Surprise”? I sure do. Back in the 1980 presidential campaign, the October Surprise was the rumor that the incumbent president, Jimmy Carter, vexed as he was by the Iranian hostage crisis, would pull off some shocking ploy—such as gaining the sudden release of the hostages—as a way of winning that year’s November election. That October Surprise never happened, of course, and maybe we’ll never really know if it was ever anything more than a figment of someone’s imagination.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

James Pinkerton: Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms Are from 1941: We Need New Freedoms in the 21st Century 

1. The Old Four Freedoms

In his 1941 State of the Union address, President Franklin D. Roosevelt articulated his vision of the American social contract, which became known as the “Four Freedoms.” These were, “freedom of speech,” “freedom of worship,” “freedom from want,” and “freedom from fear.” Those big ideas have defined much of the 20th century—and not just in America.

GettyImages-452665836 rio grande

James Pinkerton – The Democrats vs. The Deplorables, Part Two: The Immigration Flashpoint 

In an earlier article, “The Democrats vs. The Deplorables: The New Class Struggle Comes to the Midwest,” this author detailed the Democrats’ systematic campaign against the interests of American energy workers, many of them unionized—a curious stance for the presumed party of working people and labor unions. In this piece, I will outline an even more curious stance: the Democrats’ systematic campaign against American border security and American sovereignty.

Melania Trump, Donald Trump

Part II: A Manifesto for the 60 Percent: The Center-Right Populist-Nationalist Coalition

Second of two parts

In Part One, we were witness to the power of the 60 percent majority, and we saw how our 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt, welded together the center-right majority of his day to achieve historic reform—there’s a reason why TR is immortalized on Mt. Rushmore. And we also saw, more briefly, how our 37th president, Richard Nixon, also built a center-right majority.


Hillary Clinton vs. Donald Trump on Labor Day

The headline in Sunday’s Detroit Free Press was revealing: “Trump’s trade talk resonates for some union members.” Here, in what was once the citadel of organized labor, there’s anxiety—and curiosity. How will working people vote this November? For Hillary Clinton? Donald Trump? Or perhaps another candidate?

Donald Trump

‘Extreme Vetting’: Donald Trump’s Proposal on Homeland Security Harkens Back to Past Victories 

1. Trump Shakes Up the Debate Over Keeping Americans Alive

Donald Trump is talking about homeland security in clear-cut language that Americans can easily understand—and so of course the left is furious. Today’s Democrats, and their handmaidens in the Main Stream Media, just hate it when Republicans emphasize getting tough on lawlessness and terror. Indeed, liberals shudder when they hear the words, “law and order.”


The Specter of De-Gentrification: The Once and Future Suburb

1. Urban Renaissance—or False Dawn?

One of the most consequential societal trends in the last thirty years has been gentrification. In many American metropolises, gentrification has turned the term “inner city” on its head. The old image was of a poor, blighted ghetto; the new image is of an affluent yuppie/hipster playground.

FILE - In this Friday, April 15, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event in Hartford, Conn. In the event that the U.S. economy crashed, Trump has floated a recovery plan based on his own experience with corporate bankruptcy: Pay America’s creditors less than full value on the U.S. Treasurys they hold. Experts see it as a reckless idea that would send interest rates soaring, slow economic growth and undermine confidence in the world’s most trusted financial asset. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

How Trump Can Win: Jobs, Jobs, Jobs

Yes, I thought about that headline before I wrote it. Hey, I read the polls, too, and right now, for Republicans, they’re bad. I understand that the last ten nationwide surveys listed on RealClearPolitics show Hillary Clinton ahead of Donald Trump by an average of 5.5 percent. If that victory margin were to hold, Clinton would win in November with a popular-vote advantage somewhere between that of Barack Obama’s 2008 margin and his 2012 margin—which is to say, an electoral college landslide.


The Emerging Trumpian Majority

Something big is happening in American politics—bigger than this election. And so even if we can’t precisely predict the winner this November, we can know the general contours of American politics in the decades to come: populists on one side, elitists on the other.

A member of the US Army looks on after placing American flags at graves at Arlington National Cemetery May 26, 2016 in Arlington, Virginia in preparation for Memorial Day. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski        (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

The Church of Arlington National Cemetery

There’s not a lot of talking at Arlington. Even chatterboxes find themselves hushed by the endless rows of white headstones, solemn signposts of heroism, sacrifice, and duty. Yet still, Arlington speaks to me. It is there, for example, that I learned about both justice and the rule of law.