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John Hayward

John Hayward

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9 Terrible Legacies of George W. Bush and the Iraq War

It takes time to judge the full impact of an event as momentous as the Iraq War. If hindsight is 20/20, as the old saying goes, it would be foolish not to look back when 20/20 vision is finally achieved. Most effects of the Iraq War, over the long term, have proven to be disastrous.

ADDS TRUMP'S RESPONSE TO REP. WILSON - In this Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, frame from video, Myeshia Johnson cries over the casket of her husband, Sgt. La David Johnson, who was killed in an ambush in Niger, upon his body's arrival in Miami. President Donald Trump told the widow that her husband "knew what he signed up for," according to Rep. Frederica Wilson, who said she heard part of the conversation on speakerphone. In a Wednesday morning tweet, Trump said Wilson's description of the call was "fabricated." (WPLG via AP)

Questions Surround U.S. Involvement in Niger After Deadly Ambush

The killing of four U.S. soldiers in an ambush attack in Niger has both citizens and congressional representatives asking questions about the American military presence in that country. Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain (R-AZ) went so far as accusing the Trump administration of being less than “up front” about the attack and hinting that his committee might launch an investigation.

Iraqi soldiers remove a Kurdish flag from a checkpoint in Bashiqa, Iraq, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Iraqi forces took control of the mixed Yazidi-Christian town of Bashiqa on the northeastern outskirts of Mosul on Tuesday. Kurdish forces pulled out of disputed areas across northern and eastern Iraq a day after handing Kirkuk to federal forces amid a tense standoff following last month's vote for independence. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

Kurdish Outlet: Shiite Militias Beheading Peshmerga in Kirkuk

The Kurdish Rudaw news service reported Wednesday on abusive and offensive behavior by the Iran-backed Shiite militia forces occupying Kirkuk, accused the U.S. military of turning a blind eye to the Iranian invasion, and, most disturbingly, accused Shiite fighters of beheading captured Kurdish Peshmerga soldiers.

With Fall of Raqqa, ISIS Is No Longer a Terror State

Tuesday was a landmark day in the war against the Islamic State, as both the ISIS capital of Raqqa in Syria and its Philippine stronghold of Marawi were liberated. Analysts caution that ISIS has not been destroyed, but with these twin defeats, it has been broken down from a terror state back into a terrorist organization.

Iraqi security forces and volunteers celebrate in front of Governorate Council Building in Kirkuk, 290 kilometers (180 miles) north of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017. A spokesman for Iraq's state-sanctioned militias says they have "achieved all our goals" in retaking areas from Kurdish forces in and around the disputed northern city of Kirkuk. (AP Photo/Emad Matti)

Kurdish Official Forbidden to Speak Kurdish at Kirkuk Press Conference

The freshly-appointed interim governor of Kirkuk, Rakan Ali al-Jabouri, held a press conference on his first full day in office Tuesday, at which Kurdish police chief Omar Khatab was asked to speak. Khatab was also rather forcefully asked not to speak in Kurdish on three different occasions, even when responding to questions asked in that language by a Kurdish reporter.

ISTANBUL, TURKEY - JANUARY 14: Amputee Syrian freelance cameraman Mohammad Kadour, who lost his leg after being shot by an Assad regime's soldier as he had been recording video for international TV channels, reads a book in library during an exclusive interview in Istanbul, Turkey on January 14, 2017. Currently, he continues his education in the department of Cinema and Television at Istanbul Sehir University in Istanbul, Turkey. Kadour told that he plans to turn-back to his home country after his graduation. (Photo by Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Turkey Pulls 140,000 Books from Libraries for Gulenist ‘Propaganda’

Turkey’s Culture Minister Numan Kurtulmus reported to his parliament on Tuesday that some 140,000 books have been removed from libraries for “including propaganda of FETO.” FETO stands for Fethullah Terrorist Organization, which is the Turkish government’s name for followers of exiled imam Fethullah Gulen.

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