DOJ Coins New Term for Convicted Criminals: ‘Justice-Involved Individuals’

Barack Obama’s Department of Justice is deploying a new term for convicted criminals: “justice-involved individuals.”

“In an effort to help young people involved in the justice system find jobs and housing, the U.S. Departments of Justice and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) today announced $1.75 million for Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) and nonprofit legal service organizations to address the challenges justice-involved individuals face when trying to find work and a place to call home,” a statement from the Department of Justice reads.

Convicts who turned to a life of crime early on are “the future,” Attorney General Loretta Lynch said, calling them “justice-involved youth”:

The future of our nation depends upon the future of our young people – including young people who have become involved with our justice system. By helping justice-involved youth find decent jobs and stable housing after they return home, these critical grants provide a foundation for a fresh start and offer a path towards productivity and purpose. In the months ahead, the Department of Justice will continue helping justice-involved youth enrich their lives and improve our country.

The Department of Justice put money from the 2007 Second Chance Act towards the Juvenile Reentry Assistance Program, granting $1.75 million to nonprofits and Public Housing Authorities in order to help “justice-involved individuals” convicted of crimes get jobs and housing after they serve their sentence.

The Juvenile Reentry Assistance Program helps ex-cons in part by expunging or sealing the criminal records for those as old as 24 so they can live in taxpayer-funded housing.

Lynch’s statement came during “National Reentry Week,” where the Obama administration works to soften or eliminate the consequences of committing serious crimes and ensure ex-cons are given the same advantages as lifelong, law-abiding citizens.

H/T: Powerline


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