Imam’s Call to Prayer, Surah Reading at Inaugural National Interfaith Prayer Service

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Two Muslim leaders participated in the Interfaith National Prayer Service as part of inaugural activities for the Trump-Pence Administration on Saturday morning in Washington, D.C.

Executive Imam Mohamed Magid of the ADAMS Center in Sterling, Virginia lead a Muslim call to prayer. CNN reported that Magid was a leader at the Islamic Society of North America from 2010 to 2014.

In response to criticism from Muslim leaders, Magid spoke of influencing public opinion in comments to CNN. He remarked that “efforts to engage those who have misconceptions of Islam” and “efforts to influence public opinion…go hand in hand.” He told the outlet that Muslim-Americans should disseminate their message using both public protest and private meetings with government officials.

Magid was followed by Sajid Tarar of Medina Masjid in Baltimore, Maryland who read Surah Fatiha.

Also included in the interfaith ceremonies were leaders from the Christian faith, Jewish faith, Navajo Nation, Mormon, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist, and Baha’i religions.

The service also nearly doubled the number of evangelical leaders involved in the Inaugural Interfaith National Prayer Service when compared to prior years, according to Christianity Today. The report added that President Trump had requested a series of scripture readings in lieu of a sermon.

Pastor Billy Graham gave a sermon at the National Prayer Service for the inauguration of President Ronald Reagan. The Friday inauguration ceremonies for President Donald J. Trump included six faith leaders: five of the Christian faith and one of the Jewish faith. Graham’s son Franklin Graham was among those who spoke at Friday’s ceremony. Graham’s granddaughter Cissie Graham Lynch, who also works for her father Franklin Graham’s ministry Samaritan’s Purse, gave the “Prayer for Peace” at Saturday morning’s prayer service.

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