Third Eye Blind Singer: RNC Chaos Possible ‘Act of Evil Genius’ to Cover Up Bad Policy

Thursday on CNN’s special coverage of the Republican National Convention, the lead singer for the band Third Eye Blind Stephan Jenkins said he was “blown away” by the possibility that “maybe this is like an act of evil genius where if they just keep it chaotic enough, no one will focus on the fact that there is either no policy, or really bad policy.”

While discussing a Twitter video of a Third Eye Blind performance in Cleveland in which Jenkins supported LGBT rights and climate change, he said, “You left out the part I said raise your hand if you believe in science, so I think the two things that I said were both one was a question, and the other was a fact. And the fact that I stated was that LGBT Americans are not enfranchised in the RNC platform. And because I’m an artist, and not a song and dance man, I have to be playing in an environment that makes sense. So I think I didn’t want to get painted by the RNC brush and that’s why I brought it up.”

He continued, “But what blows my mind —seriously blows my mind is that it is always about a back and forth in everything that is going on in this convention. And it is really hard to get down to the policy underneath it. I was talking about a policy, they still have conversion therapy, they want to amend the constitution on marriage, and that is in a convention without any single mention of global climate change. In this entire event, there has not been one mention of climate change. The only thing that is in it that has to do with science is repealing the EPA. These are actual underlying policy bits. I think maybe this is like an act of evil genius where if they just keep it chaotic enough, no one will focus on the fact that there is either no policy, or really bad policy, like — Things like, let’s not support our NATO allies.”

Follow Pam Key on Twitter @pamkeyNEN


Comment count on this article reflects comments made on Breitbart.com and Facebook. Visit Breitbart's Facebook Page.