Boeing Ends Sales to Iran Following U.S. Sanctions

After lengthy negotiations and tight oversight by the Obama administration, Boeing in December 2016 announced a landmark agreement to sell Iran Air 80 aircraft valued at $16.6 billion
AFP/Jason Redmond

Boeing announced on Wednesday that it will not deliver any of its aircraft to Iran in light of United States sanctions on the Islamic Republic as part of America’s withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), or Iran nuclear deal.

“We have not delivered any aircraft to Iran, and given we no longer have a license to sell to Iran at this time, we will not be delivering any aircraft,” a Boeing spokesman said about the announcement, according to the AFP. “We did not factor the Iran orders into our order backlog either.”

In December 2016, Boeing announced it had agreed to sell 80 aircraft to Iran Air. The fleet was priced at $16.6 billion. AFP reported that in April 2017, Boeing also agreed “to sell Iran Aseman Airlines 30 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft for $3 billion, with purchase rights for another 30 aircraft. Deliveries were to begin in 2022.”

Russian government-controlled television network RT reported that “Boeing may lose $20bn because of #Trump’s sanctions against #Iran” along with a .gif of President Trump making a goofy face.

Russia and China have both sought to save the Iran nuclear deal and were against Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the JCPOA.

In January, the FDD released a report that revealed Iran had fired 23 missiles, at least 16 of them nuclear-capable missiles, since signing the controversial Iran nuclear deal in 2015.

Critics have argued that one of the JCPOA’s biggest flaws was that it was specifically designed to address Iran’s nuclear program, not the ballistic missiles needed to endanger the greater Middle East with the nuclear weapons, because the United States and its allies were not able to negotiate a good deal on the country’s missile program.

Boeing’s announced departure from doing business with Iran is not the first from large companies. Last week, General Electric announced it would cease all activities in Iran by November 4 and close its offices in Tehran to meet a 180-day deadline set by the Trump administration to exit the Islamic Republic.

Adelle Nazarian is a politics and national security reporter for Breitbart News. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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