California Announces First Coronavirus Death, U.S. Fatalities Reach 11

Cameron Nightingale adjusts his mask and gloves, a precaution to protect himself from coronavirus, while walking by cable car in San Francisco, California on February 27, 2020. - California said it was monitoring some 8,400 people for the new coronavirus, after officials confirmed a woman had contracted the disease without …
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California health officials on Wednesday confirmed the state’s first coronavirus death, increasing the total number of fatalities in the United States to 11.

Placer County officials said the deceased individual was an “elderly adult” who had ongoing health issues and was the second coronavirus patient in the area. It is believed the individual was infected with the deadly illness while aboard a Diamond Princess cruise ship that traveled from San Francisco and traveled to Mexico between February 11 to February 21. The person was hospitalized at Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center on February 27.

“We extend our deepest condolences to the loved ones of this patient,” Dr. Aimee Sisson, a Placer County Health Officer, said in a statement. “While we have expected more cases, this death is an unfortunate milestone in our efforts to fight this disease, and one that we never wanted to see.”

“While most cases of COVID-19 exhibit mild or moderate symptoms, this tragic death underscores the urgent need for us to take extra steps to protect residents who are particularly vulnerable to developing more serious illness, including elderly persons and those with underlying health conditions,” added Dr. Sisson.

Earlier Wednesday, Washington state health officials reported their tenth death from coronavirus.
The development comes after congressional negotiators reached an agreement Wednesday to provide $7.76 billion in funding to combat the coronavirus outbreak.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) and House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey (D-NY) hashed out the deal that will make available three times the $2.5 billion requested by the White House.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) and House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey (D-NY) lead the negotiations that will make available three times the $2.5 billion requested by the Trump administration.

“This should not be about politics; this is about doing our job to protect the American people from a potential pandemic,” Shelby said in a statement. “We worked together to craft an aggressive and comprehensive response that provides the resources the experts say they need to combat this crisis. I thank my colleagues for their cooperation and appreciate President Trump’s eagerness to sign this legislation and get the funding out the door without delay.”

The House of Representatives is expected to vote later today on the bill, according to NBC News.

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