Federal 2018 Data: Falling Killed 126 Times More People than Rifles of Any Kind

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Federal data on causes of death in America show that, as recently as 2018, falling accounted for at least 126 times as many fatalities as rifles of any kind — an inconvenient fact for Democrat lawmakers who are currently demanding a new round of nationwide gun controls.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2018 National Vital Statistics show 37,455 people died from unintentional falls throughout the year.

The same CDC data shows unintentional firearm deaths for 2018 came in at 458, which means accidental death by falling was about 82 times more likely than accidental death via any kind of firearm.

The numbers become especially pertinent to today’s political climate when FBI Unified Crime Report figures are brought into the equation. The FBI figures look at the intentional, criminal use of firearms, and show a total of 297 deaths from rifles of any kind in 2018. This means accidental death by falling occurred 126 times more often than intentional death by a rifle of any kind in 2018.

Breitbart News reported other FBI figures for 2018 showing death by hammers and clubs far exceeded death by rifles of any kind as well. Whereas there were 297 deaths by rifle, 443 people were killed with hammers, clubs, or other “blunt objects.”

The Democrats want to ban AR-15s, AK-47s, and other commonly-owned semiautomatic rifles that make up only a fraction of the deaths in which rifles of any kind were used.

AWR Hawkins is an award-winning Second Amendment columnist for Breitbart News and the writer/curator of Down Range with AWR Hawkinsa weekly newsletter focused on all things Second Amendment, also for Breitbart News. He is the political analyst for Armed American Radio. Follow him on Twitter: @AWRHawkins. Reach him at awrhawkins@breitbart.com. You can sign up to get Down Range at breitbart.com/downrange.

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