Senate Democrats Plan Nearly $4 Trillion Reconciliation Package as Far-Left Condemns Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal

Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) listens during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing March 25, 2021 on Capitol Hill in Washington DC. The committee is hearing testimony regarding the defense authorization request for fiscal year 2022. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images)
Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) said Monday Democrats are planning a nearly $4 trillion reconciliation package as the far-left voices opposition to a bipartisan infrastructure deal.

A CNN reporter tweeted Democrats are trying to “come to an agreement among themselves by July work period” with a proposal of nearly $4 trillion.

Kaine also said if Republicans block “the bipartisan deal in the Senate,” Democrats “would just fold that into the larger reconciliation bill.”

As of Monday, both parties seem skittish over the bipartisan agreement.

While the far-left condemned the plan as not going far enough to include global warming initiatives, Republicans are concerned about President Joe Biden’s two-track approach of tying the bipartisan infrastructure deal with the filibuster-immune reconciliation tactic.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) demanded assurances Monday from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) that the bipartisan infrastructure bill is not held “hostage” to reconciliation with “Green New Deal socialism.”

“Unless Leader Schumer and Speaker Pelosi walk-back their threats that they will refuse to send the president a bipartisan infrastructure bill unless they also separately pass trillions of dollars for unrelated tax hikes, wasteful spending, and Green New Deal socialism,” McConnell explained, “then President Biden’s walk-back of his veto threat would be a hollow gesture.”

Both Biden and Pelosi stated Thursday they would not support a bipartisan infrastructure proposal unless Congress passes a far-left reconciliation package with global warming provisions and tax hikes.

Sen. Alex Padilla (D-CA) stated Thursday after the deal was agreed upon that “This bipartisan deal, it’s not enough. It doesn’t meet the moment.”

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) also explained Thursday he was “not willing to support throwing climate overboard.”

In a separate tweet that has since been deleted, Wyden explained “he wants an assurance the bipartisan package tied to any larger reconciliation bill.”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) said Thursday she opposes the bipartisan deal which would need House approval after being passed in the Senate:

The diversity of this “bipartisan coalition” pretty perfectly conveys which communities get centered and which get left behind when leaders prioritize bipartisan dealmaking over inclusive lawmaking (which prioritizes delivering the most impact possible for the most people)

With the probability Democrats will not agree on a bipartisan deal or if the deal fails due to opposition on either side of the aisle, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is creating a nearly $4 trillion safety valve in which radical items may be included by slipping them in a reconciliation package that is filibuster-proof.

The chances of the bipartisan deal passing the Senate with radical Democrats supporting the measure along with Senate Republicans is unknown. It is also unknown if the House, slimly controlled by the Democrats, will also approve a Senate version of the legislation if passed.

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