productivity

Joe Biden Promises 125,000 Refugees Each Year

Joe Biden wants to import at least 125,000 refugees next year, so offering a huge inflow of cheap disposable labor to meatpackers, farm companies, retailers, and other low-wage, low-tech employers. 

Bhutanese refugees lunch at a camp in Kathmandu before leaving for the United States on December 13, 2010. More than 100,000 refugees of Nepalese origin who left Bhutan after ethnic tensions in the early 1990s, have been living in exile in United Nations refugee camps in southern Nepal. US and …

Washington Post: Migrant Labor Spreads Coronavirus

Low-wage migrant farm workers are spreading coronavirus through the southeast United States as they pick crops by hand, so the fix is more testing and medical care, not more labor-saving automation, according to the Washington Post.

FLORIDA CITY, FL - FEBRUARY 06: Workers fill a trailer with tomatoes as they harvest them in the fields of DiMare Farms on February 6, 2013 in Florida City, Florida. The United States government and Mexico reached a tentative agreement that would go into effect around March 4th, on cross-border …

NYTimes: Import More Workers to Expand the Economy

The supply of extra workers doesn’t have much effect on wages, so the government should import the foreign workers demanded by investors, says a February 27 New York Times  article, titled “Why a Top Trump Aide Said ‘We Are Desperate’ for More Immigrants.”

A farmer in Hastings, Minn. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty Images

Fear the Low-Productivity Economy of the Future

In fact, one of the worst things about politicized economics is the false promise that politicians know what the ideal economy looks like, never mind having solid plans for getting there. Is the ideal economy one in which everyone’s basic needs are covered? Welcome to the endless grey fog of the collectivist welfare or communist state, which always proves unsustainable and fails to deliver on those promises anyway.

AP Photo/Paul Sakuma

Amazon and The New ‘Big Data’ Proletariat

Amazon views its work environments as a tough response to slack conditions elsewhere in the labor force, encouraging excellence and superior effort from its workers by setting standards it proudly describes as “unreasonably high.” Many horrified readers thought the NYT article described brutally exploitative conditions covered by corporate happy-talk about achievement.

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