David Hogg: How Can We Expect Teachers to Protect Kids if Broward County Deputy Wouldn’t

David Hogg
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Parkland gun control activist David Hogg suggests Broward County deputy Scot Peterson’s decision to stay out of building 12 while the attack occurred shows that teachers cannot be expected to protect kids.

Hogg made this observation on MSBNC’s Morning Joe.

Joe Scarborough looked at Hogg and asked, “Are you starting a rising concern about how the Broward Sheriff’s operated, staying outside while the shooting was going on?”

Hogg responded, “I’m glad you bring that up. It is definitely a raising concern, the fact that they didn’t go in.” He then suggested that the deputy’s lack of action raises questions about trusting teachers to provide defense for their students: “How can you expect teachers to step in and take action if trained security guards that are part of the sheriff’s department wouldn’t take action?”

Hogg’s observation overlooks the fact that school security should is not an either/or situation but one based on a both/and approach. In other words, schools are not in a need of armed security guards or armed teachers but armed security guards and armed teachers. That way, if an armed security guards fails to confront the shooter–for whatever reason–the students can be protected by the teachers who are already there.

President Trump addressed this on February 22 by noting first responders are “5 to 8 minutes away” when a school shooting occurs but teachers are there to shoot sickos “immediately.”

AWR Hawkins is an award-winning Second Amendment columnist for Breitbart News, the host of the Breitbart podcast Bullets with AWR Hawkins, and the writer/curator of Down Range with AWR Hawkins, a weekly newsletter focused on all things Second Amendment, also for Breitbart News. He is the political analyst for Armed American Radio. Follow him on Twitter: @AWRHawkins. Reach him directly at awrhawkins@breitbart.com. Sign up to get Down Range at breitbart.com/downrange.

 

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