Trump’s Immigration Crackdown Opening Construction Jobs for Women

The 1942-1943 US wartime propaganda poster featuring "Rosie the Riveter," which celebrated the work of women during World War II
AFP
New York City, NY

President Trump’s tightened labor market through increased enforcement of immigration is forcing home builders to recruit American women, rather than relying on cheap, illegal alien workers.

A new report by MarketWatch reveals how the tightened labor market is securing construction jobs and opportunities for women who would otherwise have been passed on in favor of cheaper foreign laborers.

The report notes:

There are several demographics, not just immigrant men, that home builders will have to start tapping as a labor source. Alison Charley is the face of another: women. [Emphasis added]

Rob Dietz, the economist for the industry association, agrees. “I particularly challenge remodelers and builders to recruit more women,” he said. “I think that will occur as the industry capitalizes.” [Emphasis added]

While women are being recruited for construction jobs, home builders and Moody’s Analytics Chief Economist Mark Zandi complain that the dried-up supply of cheap, illegal workers is a crisis that must be ended by importing more foreign workers to flood the labor force.

“Without more immigration, even if we maintain the current level, we’ve got a problem,” Zandi told MarketWatch. “It’s not just about attracting more, it’s also about keeping the ones you have.”

“The crackdown on illegals is terrifying,” Zandi said. “It’s causing people to leave. More Mexicans leave than come here. That clearly is not helpful.”

Meanwhile, like farmers, home builders are increasingly turning to mechanization rather than relying on cheap, foreign workers. That automation can be seen in this Vice News report which profiles a bricklaying robot named “Sam.”

In Trump’s tightened labor market, there has been history-making wage growth for American workers in the construction industry, the garment industry, for workers employed at small businessesblack Americans, and restaurant workers.

The tight labor market has also secured higher wages for overtime workers and high-paying, coveted white-collar jobs for American teenagers.

John Binder is a reporter for Breitbart News. Follow him on Twitter at @JxhnBinder

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